latitude

(redirected from Lines of Latitude)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

latitude

 [lat´ĭ-tood]
the recording capability of x-ray film.
contrast latitude the ability of a film to record differences in density.
film latitude the ability of an emulsion to record a wide range of densities.

lat·i·tude

(la'ti-tūd),
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion. See: latitude film.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]

latitude

Etymology: L, latitudio, breadth
the ability of an x-ray imaging system to produce acceptable images over a range of exposures. If a system has wide latitude, it is possible to image parts of the body that vary in thickness or density with only one exposure. A system of lesser latitude would require a lower exposure over the thin section and a greater exposure where the absorption was greater.

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]

latitude (lat´itood),

n the range between the minimum and maximum film exposures to radiation that yields images of structures of which photographic density differences are discernible under normal viewing conditions. Latitude mainly varies directly with kilovoltage and inversely with contrast. See also contrast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Explain that lines of latitude run horizontally, or side to side.
Latitude: Lines of latitude measure distance in degrees [o] north [N] and south IS] of the equator, an imaginary line circling the globe halfway between the North and South poles.
One disadvantage is that lines of latitude and longitude do not meet at right angles.
Latitude: Lines of latitude measure distance in degrees ([degrees]) north (N) and south (S) of the equator, an imaginary line circling the globe halfway between the North and South poles (see top globe).
LATITUDE: Lines of latitude measure distance in degrees ([degrees]) north and south of the equator, an imaginary line that circles the globe halfway between the North and South poles (see Globe A).
The explorers will depart from Arkticheskiy, Russia, near which lines of latitude and longitude?