horseshoe crab

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Related to Limulus polyphemus: Horseshoe crabs

horseshoe crab

(hŏrs′shoo″, hŏrsh′oo krăb)
Limulus polyphemus, a species of saltwater arthropod that is a member of the Chelicerates, the subphylum containing scorpions and spiders, rather than the Crustaceans, the subphylum containing true crabs. The Limulus body structure has remained nearly unchanged for 450 million years, longer than almost any other living animal. Its blood is blue rather than red because oxygen is carried by a copper-based compound rather than hemoglobin, which is an iron-based compound; Limulus blood is used in testing drugs for bacterial contamination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Opsin repertoire and expression patterns in horseshoe crabs: evidence from the genome of Limulus polyphemus (Arthropoda: Chelicerata).
Body size, morphological constraints, and mated pair formation in four populations of horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus along a geographic cline.
The most comprehensive study was in the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus, where peropsin had ubiquitous expression in all three eye types (median, ventral, and lateral) as well as four regions in the nervous system (Battelle et al.
Regional differentiation and sex-based dispersal among populations of horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus.
Abundance and population structure of the Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, in Pleasant Bay, Cape Cod.
Limulus polyphemus develops through four embryonic molts and 21 morphological stages before hatching (Sekiguchi, 1988; Shuster and Sekiguchi, 2003).
Assessments of the population biology and critical habitat for the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, in the South Atlantic Bight.
The American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, Linnaeus, 1758, is valued for both its ecological and economic importance.
The horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, fishery and resource in the United States.
Another common species that inhabits or visits the intertidal zone is the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus (Linnaeus).
Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, migrate into the intertidal zone along the eastern coast of North America in the late spring-early summer to attempt to mate (Rudloe, 1979; Brockmann, 2003).
The brain of the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, contains a circadian clock that modulates the sensitivity of the lateral eyes (reviewed in Barlow, 1983).