liminal

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liminal

 [lim´ĭ-nal]
barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl),
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, for example, nerve or muscle.
[L. limen (limin-), a threshold]

liminal

/lim·i·nal/ (lim´ĭ-n'l) barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

(lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj.
Existing at the limen. Used of stimuli.

lim′i·nal′i·ty (-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
lim′i·nal·ly adv.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, e.g., nerve or muscle.

liminal

a stimulus just strong enough to excite, e.g. nerve tissue, muscle contraction

liminal

Pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
Pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.
References in periodicals archive ?
This movement of subcultures and generations within them is the expression of the larger culture's liminality, of its attempt to stabilize itself in the face of "the new" of pivotal change.
Drawing upon--and extending--Sen's (3) "capabilities approach," Kihato illustrates how migrants' capabilities are limited by their liminality and their socially embedded mobility.
The liminality of the surface suggests that the inscribed surface of skin--that which transliterates social messages--is receptive and allows for interchangeable linkages to be made with other bodies, both inanimate and animate.
The final stage of the ritual is the pre-integration where the person can be seen as more than prepared to go out from the liminality.
Undoubtedly, then, this book adds a valuable contribution to the existing scholarship on space and gender studies, as well as on liminality studies.
The first chapter of the book, "Welcome to Hillbrow, You Will Find Your People", draws upon the mythology of Johannesburg as an African Tower of Babel to examine the historical, economic and global construction of its liminality as a migrant-city.
It is a non-memoir, non-autobiographical, first-person narrative, and its form of language is as captured in liminality as is the girl herself: unformed, becoming, caught.
No, they go deeper into the experience of an unresolvable liminality.
A little later the ape and elephant are related to mandrake in "popular myth," and there follows more on mandrakes, liminality and hybridization.
We conclude by suggesting that liminal WPAs might more productively navigate their roles through a strategy we call thinking liminally or exploiting the constraints of liminality to further their professionalization and strengthen their programs.
While the essays incorporate, challenge or seek an alternative to van Gennep's classification of ritual, they also utilise Victor Turner's adaptation The Ritual Process (1969), which focuses more on van Gennep's second phase, liminality.
Miller examines the black community's diverse reaction to Don Imus's "nappy-headed ho's" statement; Roger Sneed advances the concept of liminality in his investigation of black queer life; Nessette Falu considers black lesbian identity as it is depicted in academia, film, and postmodern theory; and EL Komegay Jr.