liminal

(redirected from Liminality)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

liminal

 [lim´ĭ-nal]
barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl),
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, for example, nerve or muscle.
[L. limen (limin-), a threshold]

liminal

/lim·i·nal/ (lim´ĭ-n'l) barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

(lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj.
Existing at the limen. Used of stimuli.

lim′i·nal′i·ty (-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
lim′i·nal·ly adv.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, e.g., nerve or muscle.

liminal

a stimulus just strong enough to excite, e.g. nerve tissue, muscle contraction

liminal

Pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
Pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966 was perhaps the iconic manifestation of structuring liminality.
This was also the justification for their manifest transgression of conventional sexual roles: being neither men nor women, they were not expected to conform to the dominant and active sexual role of a male citizen; nevertheless, at the same time, they emulated Istar's own liminality and her power to transgress sexual boundaries (see, e.
Liminal Poetics: Studies in Liminality and Literature 7.
The opening of the poem links it to the country-house poem tradition, appearing to praise the humility, and appropriateness of the house, traditionally representing the character of its owner, as in Jonson's "To Penshurst"; yet the play spawned by liminality soon predominates in Marvell's description, as he paints a cartoon-like picture subtly questioning the too-humble and premature retirement of the former commander-in-chief.
One might argue that liminality is embedded primarily in anthropology and has little to do with literature, however, the concept does embrace anthropocentric discourse as the epic genre, to which The Aeneid is believed to belong, by definition, has man, as heroic as he may be, at its centre.
Familiar aspects of liminality recur here: the bifurcated structure manifesting its three-dimensionality; the subterranean structure; the agglomeration of "courts", "chambers", "colonnades", and "houses"; the vast wall enclosing the entire building, to name but three.
This liminality is negotiated not only by Link's characters but also by us, her readers, who as we read her changing narrative codes must pass back and forth across a threshold of knowing and not-knowing.
Her entrancement with liminality in cultures, genders, and technologies became the basis of her master's thesis, Engendered Machines and Humanbeasts.
As Turner says, "for me, liminality represents the midpoint of transition in a status-sequence between two positions" (237); in Hallet's case it is a dual marginality, a "rite of passage" from seen to the unseen and from living to the dead.
We are all archaeologists now" runs the title of the first chapter of The archaeological imagination which is a fair reflection of how archaeology has expanded as an academic term, to encompass a whole range of cultural issues which appear in this book: memory, landscape, narrative, ruins, relics, personal experience, liminality, peripherality, walking, haunting.
Echenoz's topology of thoroughfares and crossroads reinforces the theme of liminality, the non-space that one moves through and where identities dissolve and non-persons are created.