microscopy

(redirected from Light microscopy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Light microscopy: fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy

microscopy

 [mi-kros´kah-pe]
examination with a microscope.
fluorescence microscopy conjugation of antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents; see also fluorescence microscopy.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē),
Investigation of minute objects by means of a microscope.
See also: microscope.

microscopy

/mi·cros·co·py/ (mi-kros´kah-pe) examination under or observation by means of the microscope.

microscopy

[mīkros′kəpē]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + skopein, to look
a technique for observing minute materials with a microscope. Kinds of microscopy include darkfield microscopy, electron microscopy, and fluorescent microscopy.

microscopy

The study of a structure using a microscope.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē)
Investigation of minute objects by means of a microscope.
See also: microscope

microscopy (TSEM) (mī·krosˑ·k·pē),

n a technique that uses transmission scanning electron microscope to generate highly magnified clear three-dimensional images.

mi·cros·co·py

(mī-kros'kŏ-pē)
Investigation of minute objects with a microscope.

microscopy,

n a technique for observing microscopic materials using a microscope.
microscopy, digital epiluminescence
n computer-aided technique that employs a binocular surface microscope to examine pigmented skin lesions.
Microsporum
(mī´krōspor´əm),
n a genus of dermatophytes of the family Monilaceae.

microscopy

examination with a microscope.

confocal microscopy
a technique for obtaining high resolution images and 3-D reconstructions of biological specimens; a laser light beam is expanded to make optimal use of the optics in the objective lens and is turned into a scanning beam via an x-y deflection mechanism and is focused to a small spot by the objective lens onto a fluorescent specimen. The mixture of reflected light and emitted fluorescent light is captured by the same objective and after conversion into a static beam by the x-y scanner device is focused onto a photodetector (photomultiplier) via a dichroic mirror (beam splitter) to create the final image. Called also laser scanning microscopy; confocal scanning laser microscopy.
immunoelectron microscopy
the mixing of antibody with an antigen such as a virus on a specimen grid so as to increase the probability of visualizing a virus and to identify (type) the kind of virus present in the specimen, or antibody may be conjugated with gold and used to visualize and determine the location of specific antigenic determinants on a specimen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are the two most widely used microscopy techniques in coatings research, and each has certain drawbacks that can be overcome by the use of CLSM.
Moreover, fluorescence made detection of CLCs fast and easy especially in hypercellular areas versus the time-consuming screening for them with conventional light microscopy.
This level of clarity has never been attainable by conventional light microscopy in a commercialized and easy-to-use microscopy system.
Already proven with light microscopy, the execution of this solution on FEI systems provides SEM users with a powerful new tool.
Light microscopy does not usually provide chemical information (exceptions being the identification of fibers and minerals), but it can be used to select areas for analytical techniques such as x-ray, FTIR, and SEM.
Previously, IBO included only four technologies in this segment, but we now have added research light microscopy as an obvious complement to the other methods discussed in this section.
In an effort to combine the quantitative results obtained from light microscopy with the speed of the surface roughness techniques, the method of interferometric microscopy (IFM) has been applied to carbon black dispersion characterization in vulcanized elastomeric systems.
Light microscopy did not reveal the occurrence of cell death.
Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified by light microscopy after concentration from fecal material by a modified water-ether sedimentation method followed by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining (7).
In addition to the expected chromatographic and spectroscopic methods, there are chapters on surface energy, light microscopy, mechanical and dielectric properties, transport and barrier properties, and flammability and fire performance.
Problems with sensitivity have led experts to caution that a negative examination by polarized light microscopy does not exclude the presence of small numbers of crystals (5).