druggist

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pharmacist

 [fahr´mah-sist]
a person licensed to prepare, compound, and dispense drugs upon written order (prescription) from a licensed practitioner such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse. A pharmacist is a health care professional who cooperates with, consults with, and sometimes advises the licensed practitioner concerning drugs.

For a licensed pharmacist, five years of education is a minimum, and some curricula require six years. This gives the pharmacist advanced knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of drugs and their available dosage forms, and he or she is thus qualified to play a key role in supplying information about drugs (both prescription and over-the-counter) to patients—those to whom such information is most important. Since the pharmacist may be the last health care professional to communicate with the patient or a significant other before the medication is taken, he or she is therefore in an ideal position to discuss the drug with those concerned. The discussion may include any side effects associated with the drug, its stability under various conditions, its toxicity, its dosage, and its route of administration, all of which may be reassuring to the patient and be of benefit in helping insure patient compliance with the drug regimen.

drug·gist

(drŭg'ist),
Older but still common term for pharmacist.

druggist

/drug·gist/ (drug´ist) pharmacist.

druggist

(drŭg′ĭst)
n.
A pharmacist or person who sells drugs in a store.

drug·gist

(drŭg'ist)
Older but still common term for pharmacist.
See also: chemist

druggist

pharmacist.
References in periodicals archive ?
A warning sticker on the removable "grind" plate denies all liability for injuries, damage or death "arising from the use of this product".
In past years, cities were discouraged from building public skate parks because of the liability for injuries.
In particular, the Court has clarified that the Due Process Clause of the 5th and 14th amendments does not supplant traditional tort law in laying down rules of conduct to regulate liability for injuries that attend living together in society.
Federal Bioshield and pandemic legislation shields vaccine manufacturers and providers from all liability for injuries and deaths that occur when vaccines and drugs are administered under an Emergency Use Authorization during public health emergencies declared by government officials.
The company had argued that "light" and "moderate" turbulence, as defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is a common occurrence in air travel and can never trigger liability for injuries.
The Eleventh Circuit's decision is important to plaintiff lawyers handling medical device products liability cases in that jurisdiction because it clarifies that manufacturers of devices that received premarket approval are not immune from liability for injuries caused by their products.