Leydig cell


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Related to Leydig cell: spermatogenesis, Leydig cell tumor

Leydig cell

The testosterone-secreting cell of the testis which is located in clusters in the interstitium between the seminiferous tubules. Leydig cells are large and have centrally located nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm and numerous lipid-filled cytoplasmic vacuoles.

Function
Male sexual differentiation, pubertal androgenisation, support for fertility.
 
Physiology 
Secrete testosterone, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in response to central (pituitary) stimulation by luteinising hormone, which activates cholesterol desmolase.

Leydig cell

(lī′dĭg)
[Franz von Leydig, Ger. anatomist, 1821–1908]
One of the interstitial cells in the testes that produce testosterone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of glutathione redox state on Leydig cell susceptibility to acute oxidative stress.
The mutation was absent in the testicular, juvenile GCT; the Leydig cell tumors; and the Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors.
Leydig cells nuclear area and number of mature Leydig cells were decreased by 60.
The process of spermatogenesis depends on somatic testicular Leydig cells and Sertoli cells that control germ cell development (Sharpe et al.
IGCNU and Leydig cell hyperplasia are frequently present.
The number of sertoli and leydig cells per testis declines by 40% (22) and 44%, (23) respectively, in elderly males, which may impair spermatogenesis in the elderly.
Glucocorticoid suppresses steroidogenesis in rat progenitor Leydig cells," Journal of Andrology 31(4): 365-371.
The amount of testosterone secreted per Leydig cell was found to be much lower in male offspring after early-life exposure to BPA than in offspring from control unexposed animals.
Conversely, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome can be risk factors for hypogonadism through some similar but mostly distinct mechanisms, such as increased body weight; decreased sex hormone binding globulin levels; suppression of gonadotrophin release or Leydig cell testosterone production; cytokine-mediated inhibition of testicular steroid production; and increased aromatase activity contributing to relative estrogen excess.
The movement of testis into the scrotum is under Leydig cell control around week 12, then testosterone from week 25.
Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and reactive oxygen species inhibit Leydig cell steroidogenesis via perturbation of mitochondria.
Additionally, inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) further inhibit Leydig cell testosterone production.