superstructure

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su·per·struc·ture

(sū'pĕr-strŭk'chūr),
A structure above the surface.

superstructure

/su·per·struc·ture/ (soo´per-struk″chur) the overlying or visible portion of a structure.

su·per·struc·ture

(sū'pĕr-strŭk'shŭr)
A structure above the surface.

su·per·struc·ture

(sū'pĕr-strŭk'shŭr)
A structure above the surface.

superstructure,

n a structure constructed on or over another structure.
superstructure casting,
n in the subperiosteal implant, a surgical alloy bar designed with clasps to telescope over the four abutments. To this casting is processed the final denture superstructure.
superstructure, implant,
n (implant denture superstructure), 1. a removable denture that fits snugly onto the protruding implant abutments. Sometimes called the
implant denture. 2. the denture that is retained, supported, and stabilized by the implant denture substructure.
superstructure, implant, attaching material,
n the denture resin by which the superstructure teeth are attached to the superstructure frame.
superstructure, implant, attachment,
n a part of the superstructure that fits onto the implant abutments. May be a precision attachment coping, a conventional clasping, or a combination of a precision attachment with clasps.
superstructure, implant, connectors,
n the rigid bars that unite the superstructure attachments into one strong element.
superstructure, implant, denture,
n See superstructure, implant.
superstructure, implant, frame,
n the metal skeleton of the superstructure, consisting of attachments and connectors.
superstructure, temporary (implant surgical splint),
n an acrylic resin immediate appliance with six anterior teeth; has no metal clasps, precision coping, or frame; fitted closely over the implant abutments immediately after the surgical insertion of the substructure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in the level of practice among the public health areas are shown in Table 4.
Because PHAs 4 and 11 were consistently different, the data were grouped according to urban (PHAs 4 & 11) and rural (all other) areas, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to determine if a significant difference existed between the level of practice between these groups.
These results are very different from the outcome of the assessment of level of practice of the essential services, where PHAs 4 and 11 were significantly different than other PHAs.
Substantial variation occurred in the level of practice of essential services (Figure 1).
Although some statistically significant differences occurred in level of practice among PHAs, most areas were consistent across the essential services (Table 4).
New programs will be needed and new methods of education will be required to enable practitioners to advance from one level of practice to the next.
The first level of practice includes new standards for training and certification and this should result in higher skill levels in these important areas of clinical laboratory practice.
revise staffing plans based upon the new levels of practice to maximize the use of practitioners at each level of practice.
provide the continuing education needed for each level of practice.
determine the number of laboratory practitioners needed at each level of practice and determine the ability of the educational programs to meet that demand.
Some nurses in the 2006 survey suggested that the recertification process (every three years) should be modified and reduced if the nurse was working in the same clinical area and applying for the same level of practice.