leukaemia

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Related to Leukemias: Acute Leukemias

leukaemia

See leukemia.

leu·ke·mi·a

(lū-kē'mē-ă)
Progressive proliferation of abnormal white blood cells found in hemopoietic tissues, other organs, and usually in the blood in increased numbers. Leukemia is classified by the dominant cell type, and by duration from onset to death, which occurs in acute leukemia within a few months in most cases, and is associated with acute symptoms including severe anemia, hemorrhages, and slight enlargement of lymph nodes or the spleen. The duration of chronic leukemia exceeds 1 year, with a gradual onset of symptoms of anemia or marked enlargement of spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.
Synonym(s): leucaemia, leukaemia.
[leuko- + G. haima, blood]

leukaemia

one of several forms of cancer in LEUCOCYTES, resulting in an uncontrolled increase of immature white blood cells in body organs and often in the blood itself This leads to increased susceptibility to infection and anaemia, and to the enlargement of the spleen, liver and lymph nodes.

leukaemia

progressive proliferation of abnormal leukocytes and enlargement of lymphoid tissues (lymph glands, spleen, bone marrow); characterized by anaemia, haemorrhages, increasing exhaustion and susceptibility to infection
  • acute leukaemia leukaemia of <6 months' duration

  • chronic leukaemia leukaemia >12 months' duration

  • granulocytic leukaemia; myelocytic leukaemia; myeloid leukaemia characterized by large numbers of immature and mature granulocytes in tissues, organs and circulating blood

  • lymphocytic leukaemia; lymphoid leukaemia; lymphatic leukaemia leukaemia characterized by enlargement of lymphoid tissues, and increased numbers of lymphocytes in tissues, organs and circulating blood

leu·ke·mi·a

(lū-kē'mē-ă)
Progressive proliferation of abnormal leukocytes found in hemopoietic tissues, other organs, and usually in the blood in increased numbers; classified by dominant cell type, and by duration from onset to death. This occurs in acute leukemia within a few months in most cases, and is associated with acute symptoms including severe anemia, hemorrhages, and slight enlargement of lymph nodes or the spleen. Chronic leukemia lasts over 1 year, with a gradual onset of symptoms of anemia or marked enlargement of spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.
Synonym(s): leucaemia, leukaemia.
[leuko- + G. haima, blood]

Patient discussion about leukaemia

Q. What is Leukemia? My brother's best friend has been diagnosed with Leukemia. What is it? Is it dangerous? Can you recover from it?

A. Leukemia is the general name for four different types of blood cancers. In people with leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. The abnormal cells are leukemia cells. At first, leukemia cells function almost normally. In time, they may crowd out normal white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This makes it hard for blood to do its work. After diagnosis, many people with leukemia do survive and live many good, quality years. The relative five-year survival rate has more than tripled in the past 47 years for patients with leukemia. In 1960-63, when compared to a person without leukemia, a patient had a 14 percent chance of living five years. By 1975-77, the five year relative survival rate had jumped to 35 percent, and in 1996-2003 the overall relative survival rate was nearly 50 percent.

Q. What causes Leukemia? How can one get Leukemia?

A. Not all the causes of leukemia are known. However there are some causes that are suspected. Nowadays as the pollution is increasing and use of chemicals in various parts of life has increased, people who come in contact with toxic chemicals, radiations etc. are at greater risk of developing leukemia, hereditary also plays a role at some extent.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

More discussions about leukaemia
References in periodicals archive ?
We identified two new targets in leukemic cells bearing this mutation, which when targeted or inhibited, cause leukemia cells to die," Dr.
That changed when other scientists showed that the drug imatinib mesylate, or Gleevec, can thwart chronic myelogenous leukemia in animals and people by inhibiting another mutant tyrosine kinase (SN: 12/11/99, p.
5 times more leukemia than females between ages 15 and 30, although females in this age group are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer of any type, the analysis showed.
Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of clonal stem cell disorders that give rise to progressive cytopenias (decreases in white cells, red cells and platelets), which can evolve into acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
There was no excess mortality from leukemia when the industrial workers were compared with the general U.
When damaged, the two molecules join to create a single protein, BCR-ABL; that ignites leukemia.
Edited by experts from one of the world's largest leukemia centers, this book provides information on the biology of the variety of leukemic disorders, up-to-date diagnostic testing and many new developments in therapy.
Researchers gave 61 leukemia patients various doses of STI-571, made by Novartis Pharmaceuticals of East Hanover, N.
In addition, two AML patients with leukemia cutis had significant shrinkage of leukemic infiltrates in their skin.
However, the 71 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia were significantly more likely to carry the common gene version than were 114 matched healthy people, says study coauthor Christine F.
have teamed with colleagues from seven other institutions to investigate leukemia risks associated with postsurgical treatments involving radiation, cell-killing drugs or both.

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