lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

(redirected from Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase)

lec·i·thin-cho·les·ter·ol ac·yl·trans·fer·ase (LCAT),

(les'i-thin-kō-les'tĕr-ōl as'ĭl-trans'fĕr-ās),
An enzyme that reversibly transfers an acyl residue from a lecithin to cholesterol, forming a 1-acylglycerophosphocholine (a lysolecithin) and a cholesteryl ester; a deficiency of this enzyme leads to accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in plasma resulting in anemia, proteinuria, renal failure, and corneal opacities; LCAT is also low in people with fish eye disease.

lecithin–cholesterol acyltransferase

/lec·i·thin–cho·les·ter·ol ac·yl·trans·fer·ase/ (LCAT) (kah-les´ter-ol a″sil-trans´fer-ās) an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cholesteryl esters in high-density lipoproteins; deficiency of enzyme activity, an inherited disorder, results in accumulation of cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in plasma and tissues, which causes corneal opacities, anemia, and often proteinuria.
References in periodicals archive ?
HDL]) by lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in plasma containing only HDLs (9).
Assays of lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT).
The activity of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase increased significantly in contrast to the activities of lipoprotein lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase.