learning disability

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learn·ing dis·a·bil·i·ty

a disorder in one or more of the basic cognitive and psychological processes involved in understanding or using written or spoken language; may be manifested in age-related impairment in the ability to read, write, spell, speak, or perform mathematical calculations.

learning disability

n.
Any of various neurodevelopmental disorders that affect the ability to process information and may impede academic learning, especially in the areas of language, mathematics, and reasoning. Also called learning disorder.

learning disability

an abnormal condition often affecting children of normal or above-average intelligence, characterized by difficulty in learning such fundamental procedures as reading, writing, and numeric calculation. The condition may result from psychological or organic causes and is usually related to slow development of perceptual motor skills. See also attention deficit disorder, dysgraphia, dyslexia.

learning disability

An impairment or significantly reduced ability to learn or understand new or complex information, which translates as impaired intelligence, underdeveloped language skills and reduced ability to function independently, or impaired social functionality.

learning disability

Psychiatry A suboptimal ability to read–dyslexia, write–dysgraphia, perform mathematical operations–dyscalculia, or other cognitive skills in a child of presumed normal intelligence. See ADD, Dyslexia, Minimal brain dysfunction.

learn·ing dis·a·bil·i·ty

(lĕrn'ing dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
A disorder in one or more of the basic cognitive and psychological processes involved in understanding or using written or spoken language; may be manifested in age-related impairment in the ability to read, write, spell, speak, or perform mathematical calculations.

learning disability

A well-meaning euphemism for mental retardation. Other terms include developmental reading disorder and developmental word blindness. The condition should not be confused with DYSLEXIA which is a specific disorder. Young people with learning disability experience exceptional difficulty in acquiring an average standard of education. Learning disability is always apparent by the age of seven or, in severe cases, earlier. In spite of considerable research, the causes and nature remain obscure and controversial. There is no disagreement, however, that in mild cases the best treatment is intensive, individually-tailored, one-to-one instruction in reading and writing by an experienced remedial teacher. Behavioural and emotional problems, often secondary to the learning disability, also require appropriate skilled attention.

learn·ing dis·a·bil·i·ty

(lĕrn'ing dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
Disorder in one or more basic cognitive and psychological processes involved in understanding or using written or spoken language; may be manifested in age-related impairment in ability to read, write, spell, speak, or perform mathematical calculations.

Patient discussion about learning disability

Q. Could ADHD be the reason my nine year old can not read or tell the difference between 16 and 60? My nine year old can not read or remember how to spell little words like as and on. She also has major problems with complicated sorting that other child younger then her can do. The school says it is because she is not on medication for her ADHD. She has a younger sister who has ADHD and is not on medication and she is doing well in school. Can ADHD cause all her problems or is there something else going on.

A. I have a 13-year-old child who has ADHD along with learning disabilities including an auditory processing disorder and a working memory disorder (diagnosed in 2nd grade). Not sure if the attention symptoms are because of the learning disabilities, etc. LD goes hand in hand with ADHD and vice verse. A very high percentage of people who have ADHD also have something else going on such as learning disabilities, oppositional defiance disorder, bipolar disorder, etc. My child is 13 now and has always exhibited signs of ADHD, LD and ODD. You should have your child tested at the school level for learning disabilities. Write a letter requesting testing for learning disabilities and give it to your school's principal. The school then has I believe 30 days to respond with testing.This will let you know if your child also has a learning disability going on with the ADHD. It also gives you the option of allowing your child to receive Special Education services in a resource class.

More discussions about learning disability
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