learning curve

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learning curve

a graphic presentation of the effects of a specified method of teaching or training on the ability of a subject to learn, as shown by improved performance in a particular task.

learning curve

A negative deviation in a desired or anticipated outcome or result, which rises toward a (desired) norm as experience with the activity of interest accumulates.

learning curve

The effect of learning or practice on the performance of an intellectual or physical task. The term describes the acquisition of competence with experience, time, and training.
See also: curve
References in periodicals archive ?
For learning curves, similar computational analysis can be performed to assess the forgetting-induced properties of the curves.
The application of half-life analysis to learning curves can help address questions such as:
The half-life analysis can be applied to learning curves to determine when each cost element of interest will decrease to half of its starting value.
The learning curve formula is needed when dealing with situations that do not fit into this doubling-up pattern.
A learning curve is geometric with the general form Y = a[X.
b = the learning index or coefficient, which is calculated as: log learning curve percentage / log 2.
Abstract--A learning curve analysis is applied to model the change in effort units with time by the commercial fishery for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Barents Sea.
A learning curve describes how unit costs decline as organizations gain experience in production (Argot and Epple, 1990).
By fitting a regression line to ln(epsf) versus ln(t), estimates of the parameters ln(a) and b in the learning curve are obtained.
The Learning Curve and Production Standards: Learning Implications
This article examines the components of the learning curve model from a behavioral perspective.
The learning curve effect was originally addressed in the literature by T.

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