Latino


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Latino

(lah-tēn′ō)
1. Pert. to Latin-American language, culture, or ethnicity.
2. A person of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking ancestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
At Excelencia in Education, we have made a commitment to understand what it means to serve Latino students in higher education today.
For Latino professionals, serving on boards is a great opportunity to be of service to society and to the Latino community by providing much needed leadership and role modeling success for the next generation.
Gibson praised the Latino actors, set designers, and makeup artists who worked on the film, saying they were ``high caliber'' and had an ``outrageous'' work ethic.
In addition, many of these areas have resegregated with a different racial group, like west suburban Cicero, a former all-white ethnic enclave that is now nearly 80 percent Latino.
While it is beyond the scope of this paper to fully describe a systematic consultation approach to working with Latino students and families, this paper proposes that current models of consultation do not fully address the specific needs of Latino students in order to achieve the best possible outcomes for this population.
Meet Octavio Campos, creator of dance-theater pieces reflecting Latino issues in postmodernist modes culled from training and performing in the U.
As for religious education programs for kids, you'd have to create materials for Latino kids in the U.
According to the survey results, an astounding three out of four Latino young adults who are currently not in college said they might have changed their expectations had they known about financial assistance.
In a way, I haven't really adjusted," says Aguilar, an artist who also works at Las Aguilas, a social support group for San Francisco's enormous lesbian and gay Latino population.
Latino immigrants, who often come to the United States poorly educated, have a particularly hard time getting a foothold on the ladder in the new economy, Suro believes.
For years, many Americans have viewed Latinos as less than white and have enforced this perspective to exclude them from education, employment, political representation, and much else.
However, among Latino participants the ratio was approximately 40 to 60 percent motor vehicle to firearm.