Lathyrus


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Related to Lathyrus: Lathyrus latifolius, Lathyrus odoratus, Lathyrus sativus, Lathyrus vernus, Lathyrus japonicus, lathyrism

Lathyrus

genus of plants in legume family Fabaceae; toxin is 3-aminopropionitrile; causes neurological disease, including excitability, convulsions and death without skeletal lesions; includes L. angulatus, L. aphaca, L. cicera, L. clymenum, L. hookeri, L. latifolius, L. nissolia (grass vetchling), L. polymorphus subsp. incanus, L. pusillus (singletary pea), L. sativus, L. splendens (Pride of California), L. sylvestris, L. tingitatus (Tangier pea).

Lathyrus hirsutus
causes poisoning in cattle, the main sign being lameness due to pain in the feet. Called also Kaley pea, wild winter pea, Indian pea.
Lathyrus odoratus
the ornamental sweetpea, of which the seeds cause skeletal abnormality when fed experimentally; may cause equine stringhalt.
References in periodicals archive ?
elatior Artemisia princeps Bromus catharticus Calystegia soldanella 1 12 Carex kobomugi + 11 Elymus mollis Imperata cylindrica Ixeris repens 10 Lathyrus japonicus ssp.
sativus with a low-neurotoxin Middle Eastern relative, Lathyrus ciliolatus, notes William Erskine, the institute's director of germ plasm research.
I still can't make up my mind whether I prefer this form, or Lathyrus Alboroseus, which has the same attractive leaves but pink and white flowers.
He was rather supposing a reenactment of the historical events to which Isaiah's prophecy originally referred: Ptolemy Lathyrus was stopped short of conquering Jerusalem, just as Sennacherib had been earlier.
Furthermore, the fruit set in Lathyrus vernus was not improved even after outcross pollen was added to the late flowers [13].
villosa, Lablab purpureus, Lathyrus tuberosus, Rhodotypos scandens, multiple species of Rubus spp.
Floral ontogeny in Lathyrus latifolius (Fabaceae-Vicieae).
Aletor VA, El- Moneim AA and AV Goodchild Evaluation of the seed of selected lines of three lathyrus spp for b -n- oxayloamino-l-alanine (BOAA); tannins, trypsin inhibitory activity and certain in-vitro characteristics.
Noteworthy collections also include first reports for Fraxinus quadrangulata and Carya caroline-septentrionalis from the Blue Ridge and a, first report of the non-native Lathyrus sylvestris from Tennessee.
The crude ash level of vegetation showed a range of variability between 113 g/kg for Lathyrus sativus and 151 g/kg for Trifolium pratense.