fingerprint

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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint

fingerprint

/fin·ger·print/ (-print)
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.

fingerprint

an image left on a smooth surface by the pattern of the pad of a distal phalanx. The distinctive pattern of loops and whorls represents the fine ridges marking the skin. Because each individual's fingerprints are unique, a classification system of the patterns is useful in identifying individuals.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.

dermatoglyphics

finger and toe prints; pattern of lines and whorls in pulp skin unique to the individual

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.

fingerprint

References in periodicals archive ?
Applying Fractional Diffusion Smoothing to Latent Fingerprint 2
Of course, latent fingerprints obtained from a crime scene must be matched to a suspect through database records of identified fingerprints if they are to help law enforcement.
Interestingly, the court acknowledges this, noting, "the existence of any error rate at all seems strongly disputed by some latent fingerprint examiners.
9:10 VARIOUS TECHNIQUES FOR LIFTING LATENT FINGERPRINTS FROM HUMAN SKIN
Fingerprints are left on numerous surfaces and it is possible to readily acquire a latent fingerprint in under 60 seconds using a variety of known methods.
Alimberti, who was hired by the Worcester Police Department as a laboratory technician in 2008, became a latent fingerprint examiner for the Latent Print Unit in July 2010.
It's a far cry from the work carried out at NETPark by Roar Particles Ltd - set to revolutionise the market for latent fingerprint powders which record and define prints.
With 238,135 requests for latent fingerprint comparisons in 2002 alone, a false positive error rate of 2 percent implies up to 4,800 false convictions or guilty pleas made in hopes of a lighter sentence each year in the U.
Richard Leas served as the Major Incident Program Manager in the FBI Laboratory's Latent Print Support Unit before retiring and joining Oak Ridge Associated Universities as a Latent Fingerprint Examiner.
Once a latent fingerprint is entered into a computer, commercial software is often used to enhance its quality.
Latent fingerprint examiners form the nucleus of the FBI Disaster Squad.
One set of minutiae contains all minutiae points on the latent fingerprint; the second set contains all minutiae points on the tenprint mate; the other two sets contain the minutiae points in common between the latent fingerprint and tenprint mate.