Lamarckian

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Lamarckian

(lə-mär′kē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Lamarckism.
n.
A supporter of Lamarckism.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the way that Hugo deals with the tension between the unity of a Nation and the transformation of its culture over time--as read in its monuments--we may once again fancy that we hear echoes of Lamarckian transformist thought, or, more particularly, of its development by Geoffroy in the form of the theory of the unite de composition of the animal kingdom.
We have already seen in connection with Michelet that Romantic historiography was not a development of Lamarckian transformism but an anticipation of Darwinian evolutionary thought which resulted from the application of an organicist ontology (borrowed from the natural sciences) to human rather than natural "institutions.
To avoid anachronism, we will use the standard contemporary term, "transmutation," to refer to the idea of the variability of species, and "transformism" either to refer to Laurent's analytical category (in which case it is marked by inverted commas), or else as the conventional name for the specifically Lamarckian account of the transmutation of species.
The airing of the Lamarckian position in the work of French and American "neo-lamarkians" at the same time is passed over in silence.
So when Lyell publicly accepted the transmutation of species in 1863, and after prolonged discussion with Darwin, he was simply letting his true lamarckian colors show.
Vernon Kellogg, whose Darwinism To-Day (1907) Wharton also read, agreed that modern research seemed to discredit Lamarckian theory.
Thus, Wharton had some scientific justification for retaining the Lamarckian ideas she absorbed before 1908.
This passage shows the Lamarckian notion of a race's long-standing actions, as opposed to the environment alone, effecting transformation.
Through Lamarckian inheritance and personal cultivation, an individual must also possess the right sensibility derived from the right type of culture within the race: what Bentley discusses as Arnoldian Culture (71).
The difference between a Lamarckian environment and a Darwinian one is the role of the organism itself.
All of these assertions come from the Lamarckian dimension of The House of Mirth, but Lily's epiphany seems also to prove them wrong.
Bender and Preston both discuss Lamarckism but do not work out extensive readings of Wharton in light of Lamarckian theory.