Lamarckian


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Lamarckian

(lə-mär′kē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Lamarckism.
n.
A supporter of Lamarckism.
References in periodicals archive ?
But such arguments are not convincing: at best they might indicate that Michelet himself thought that he was applying Lamarckian natural science to history; but this is not the same as the assertion that Michelet's and Lamarck's approaches to their subjects repose on the same conceptual foundations.
Gilman links eugenicist ideas with a Lamarckian explanation for the improvements in their culture and people.
The fact that de Chelles has inherited acquired characteristics clearly revealed by his physiognomy demonstrates Wharton's dialogic play of both Lamarckian and Mendelian principles.
Furthermore, even if organizations would be relatively flexible, the validity of the Lamarckian view depends upon whether rational and planned organizational changes are possible at all.
But Haeckel's writings, which began as orthodox Darwinism, became increasingly Lamarckian in the sense that "internal pseudo-psychic forces" caused organic evolution rather than external natural selection.
Those discourses demonstrate the remarkable resilience of Lamarckian tenets of environmental evolution, decades after the rediscovery of Mendel's genetic theory and the development of genetics as a scientific specialism.
In the Soviet Union, Trofim Denisovich Lysenko (1898-1976) promoted the Lamarckian view of the inheritance of acquired characteristics.
The idea that heritable changes can result from environmental effects and cellular experiences is a radical one for biologists, who rejected the Lamarckian model of evolution in favor of a gene-based, Darwinian view in the 1930s and '40s.
By the 1980s, Keynesianism seemed as vanquished as Lamarckian biology.
In the second chapter entitled "The Impact of Darwinism" Haywood Ferreira traces reactions to Darwin's theory of evolution by Latin American proponents of Lamarckian evolution and Spencerian Social Darwinism.
Hale recalls nineteenth-century Darwinian and Lamarckian views of evolution, argues that inheritance of temperamental traits a la Lamarck had buttressed the hopes of Morris and other reformists for revolutionary social change within a few generations, and concludes that "our own skepticism about the possibility of a radically different future is no less culturally contingent than was Morris's optimism" (p.