incubation period

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

1. time interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes; Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (2) , latent stage, stage of invasion
2. in a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

[in′kyəbā′shən]
Etymology: L, incubare, to lie on; Gk, peri, around, hodos, way
1 the time between exposure to a pathogenic organism and the onset of symptoms of a disease.
2 the time required to induce the development of an embryo in an egg or to induce the development and replication of tissue cells or microorganisms being grown in culture media or other special laboratory environment.
3 the time allowed for a chemical reaction or process to proceed.

incubation period

The time elapsed between infection and appearance of disease Sx. Cf Latent period Epidemiology A period of subclinical or inapparent pathologic changes after exposure, ending with the onset of Sx of an infection.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

The interval between the time of infection and the first appearance of symptoms of the resulting disease. Incubation periods vary widely, from as little as a few hours in the case of CHOLERA to many weeks in some cases of RABIES.

Incubation period

The interval from initial exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus, and the first symptoms of illness.

incubation period

time period between contact with an infectious agent and clinical manifestation of disease

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period,

n the lapsed time between exposure to an infectious agent and the onset of symptoms of a disease.

incubation

1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. development of a disease by multiplication of an infectious agent within the host.
3. the development of the embryo in the eggs of oviparous animals. See also avian incubation periods.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a neonate, especially a premature one.

artificial incubation
use of a machine which warms, turns, humidifies bird eggs to incubate and eventually hatch them.
incubation behavior
see avian broodiness; almost non-existent in egg-laying birds; persists in meat strains and turkeys.
incubation period
the interval between effective exposure to a pathogenic infectious agent, leading to the invasion of the body and the establishment of the infection, and the appearance of the first clinical signs of the disease in question. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several years, depending on the causative organism and type of disease. See also extrinsic incubation period.
References in periodicals archive ?
05) in the lag time was observed among all the varieties (Table 3).
PS deficiency was characterized by a decrease in the percentage of APC-induced ETP inhibition and a decrease in lag time in the absence of APC (P <0.
4 mm) categories revealed the lag time of low impact development was not significantly greater then the traditional development for large storms.
In the literature, even 20 years ago, the lag time for diagnosing IBD was 11 months, and one study from 1990 to 1995 reported a lag time of 7.
If melanoma has a 20-year lag time and sunscreen is protective, the melanoma rate should have started to level off by now.
Again, the results are grouped by lag time and variable.
To measure the rate of compensation, the compensation lag time must be estimated for each stem pair.
This pipeline combined with the typical repeat schedules should give the networks a lag time into the first few months of 2008 before new programming is necessary.
With an approximate nine to twelve-month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending, the ABI is a leading economic indicator of construction activity, and should translate into a high level of activity throughout 2007.
Results from the necropsy did not determine whether the lag time contributed to her death, zoo officials said.
The economist explains that it takes a period of time for Congress to notice there's a problem, then there's another lag while they're debating on setting policy, and further lag time as the legislation is implemented.
It was originally slated to begin with the launch of fully commercial 3G services on October 1, but was put back because of the long lag time between the downloading and playing of video clips.