Lachman test


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Lach·man test

(lok'man),
a maneuver to detect deficiency of the anterior cruciate ligament; with the knee flexed 20-30°, the tibia is displaced anteriorly relative to the femur; a soft endpoint or greater than 4 mm of displacement is positive (abnormal).

Lachman test

Sports medicine A clinical maneuver used to determine the effects of anterior shear loads applied to the knee at 30º flexion; the LT is preferred to the anterior drawer test for evaluating the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. See Anterior drawer test.

Lach·man test

(lak'măn test)
A maneuver to detect deficiency of the anterior cruciate ligament; with the knee flexed 20-30 degrees, the tibia is displaced anteriorly relative to the femur; a soft endpoint of greater than 4 mm displacement is positive (i.e., abnormal).
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LACHMAN TEST: Biomechanics of the Lachman test for anterior cruciate laxity

Lachman test

(lok″măn)
[John Lachman, contemporary U.S. orthopedic surgeon]
A test evaluate the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The examiner stands on the side being examined and grasps the tibia at the level of the tibial tubercle while stabilizing the femur with the other hand. The patient relaxes the leg while the examiner holds the knee flexed at 25° to 30° and pulls forward on the tibia while stabilizing the femur. Excessive motion relative to the opposite knee or no discernible end point determine a positive result.
See: illustration
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References in periodicals archive ?
We used Lachman test and anterior drawer test for knee laxity rate.
There was no significant difference in Lachman test before and after surgery for the healthy knee in any study group, nor was there a difference between the healthy knee and injured knee results after ACL reconstruction.
For all other negative outcome measures including positive Lachman test, positive pivot-shift test, IKDC grade C or D, and graft failure proportions were larger for allograft than for autograft, but after statistical analysis, the differences were not significant.
All the 20(100%) patients had positive pre-operative Lachman test, anterior drawer test and Slocum test.
At this point, she had a normal knee exam with no effusion, negative Lachman test, negative anterior and posterior drawer tests, and she was stable to varus and valgus stresses.
The collateral ligaments were tested and cleared, and the ACL had a clear end feel on the Lachman test.
Physical examination (including the Lachman test, Drawer sign, and McMurray test) by an orthopedist or sports medicine-trained physician was 74% to 88% sensitive and 72% to 95% specific for suspected meniscal or ligamentous injuries; MRI added marginal value in referral decisions regarding these conditions.
The pivot shift test had the highest positive predictive value, and the Lachman test the highest negative predictive value.
A drawer test is positive in 50% of patients with ACL tears, and a Lachman test is positive in 95% of cases.
The Lachman test is the most sensitive exam maneuver for detecting ACL sprains.