Lachman test


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Lach·man test

(lok'man),
a maneuver to detect deficiency of the anterior cruciate ligament; with the knee flexed 20-30°, the tibia is displaced anteriorly relative to the femur; a soft endpoint or greater than 4 mm of displacement is positive (abnormal).

Lachman test

Sports medicine A clinical maneuver used to determine the effects of anterior shear loads applied to the knee at 30º flexion; the LT is preferred to the anterior drawer test for evaluating the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. See Anterior drawer test.

Lach·man test

(lak'măn test)
A maneuver to detect deficiency of the anterior cruciate ligament; with the knee flexed 20-30 degrees, the tibia is displaced anteriorly relative to the femur; a soft endpoint of greater than 4 mm displacement is positive (i.e., abnormal).
Enlarge picture
LACHMAN TEST: Biomechanics of the Lachman test for anterior cruciate laxity

Lachman test

(lok″măn)
[John Lachman, contemporary U.S. orthopedic surgeon]
A test evaluate the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The examiner stands on the side being examined and grasps the tibia at the level of the tibial tubercle while stabilizing the femur with the other hand. The patient relaxes the leg while the examiner holds the knee flexed at 25° to 30° and pulls forward on the tibia while stabilizing the femur. Excessive motion relative to the opposite knee or no discernible end point determine a positive result.
See: illustration

Lachman test

an alternative to the anterior drawer test in assessment of the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), useful as it removes the limitation of the anterior drawer when the hamstrings contract, but is sometimes difficult to perform in athletes with well-developed musculature or where the examiner has small hands. With the patient on a couch, the examiner holds the thigh firmly and flexes the knee to around 20°. The tibia is then drawn forwards to assess cruciate integrity compared to the uninjured knee. The test is graded on the magnitude of movement and whether there is a firm or soft endpoint.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this point, she had a normal knee exam with no effusion, negative Lachman test, negative anterior and posterior drawer tests, and she was stable to varus and valgus stresses.
The pivot shift test had the highest positive predictive value, and the Lachman test the highest negative predictive value.
If the prior probability is low (say 10%, eg in general practice), a negative Lachman test will almost rule out an ACL rupture (probability decreasing from 10% to 2%), whereas a (difficult to perform and, therefore, less suitable) positive pivot shift test will result in referral to secondary care for further investigation (probability increasing from 10% to more than 60%).
Through four subsidiaries -- Kidum Test Prep, Lachman Test Prep, Publishing House and Wall Street Institute School of English -- Kidum provides test preparation for Israeli high school exit and university admissions exams, English language study programs and prep courses for the U.
Headquartered in Tel Aviv, The Kidum Group has three main lines of business: Kidum Test Preparation, which provides classroom-based test preparation for the psychometric exam; Lachman Test Preparation, which provides classroom based test preparation for the matriculation and psychometric exams; and WSI Training Ltd.
Three common manual manipulations used to assess ligament laxity are the classic anterior/posterior drawer test, the Lachman test introduced by Torg et al (3), and the pivot shift test first described by Galway and Macintosh (4).
This technique has evolved from the figure-of-four modified Lachman test and taught in the examination of the knee component of the original Sports Medicine Course at the London Hospital Medical College, the precursor of the current Centre of Sports and Exercise Medicine (CSEM).
The Lachman test is widely used to evaluate knee laxity after ACL rupture and the success of ACL reconstruction.
The patient also had a positive anterior drawer and Lachman test without a firm endpoint.
At the one-year follow-up, the patient had 0[degrees] to 130[degrees] of motion in the left knee as well as a negative Lachman test.