Listeria monocytogenes

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Lis·te·ri·a mon·o·cy·to·g'enes

a bacterial species causing meningitis, encephalitis, septicemia, endocarditis, abortion, abscesses, and local purulent lesions; often fatal; found in healthy ferrets, insects, and the feces of chinchillas, ruminants, and humans, as well as in sewage, decaying vegetation, silage, soil, and fertilizer. Sometimes involved in infections in immunocompromised hosts. A causative agent of perinatal infections, neonatal sepsis, and septicemia; also recently linked to food-borne diseases; especially associated with meat and dairy products.

Listeria monocytogenes

[lister′ē·ə mon′ōsītoj′inēz]
Etymology: Joseph Lister; Gk, mono, single, kytos, cell, genein, to produce
a common species of gram-positive motile bacilla that cause listeriosis and a noninvasive food-borne diarrheal disease.

Lis·te·ri·a mon·o·cy·to·ge·nes

(lis-tēr'ē-ă mon-ō-sī-toj'ĕ-nēz)
Bacterial species causing meningitis, encephalitis, septicemia, endocarditis, abortion, abscesses, and local purulent lesions; often fatal; found in feces, sewage, decaying vegetation, silage, soil, and fertilizer. Sometimes involved in infections in immunocompromised hosts; causes perinatal infections, neonatal sepsis, and septicemia; recently linked to food-borne diseases; especially associated with processed meat and dairy products.

Listeria monocytogenes

The causative agent of listeriosis. This species lives in soil or the intestines of animals and may contaminate food, esp. milk or meat. Its growth is not inhibited by refrigeration.
See also: Listeria
References in periodicals archive ?
Her research interests focus on food safety and molecular typing methods, especially on those for L.
Isolates found to ferment mannitol and xylose and positive to rhamnose were considered as L.
Ademas, se ha reportado una elevada frecuencia de L.
TABLE 1 Resistance Profile of Listeria Isolates Species # Isolates Resistant Isolates AM CF CTX CAZ L.
Evaluation of luciferase reporter bacteriophage A: 511luxAB for detection of L.
Improperly performed pasteurization and the occurrence of contamination after pasteurization are the most likely explanations for the presence of L.
Se ha reportado 3,6% de muestras de diversos alimentos positivos a L.
ARS microbiologist Judy Arnold at the Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit in Athens, Georgia, has been looking for improved methods to control biofilms containing L.