glutamic acid

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Related to L-glutamate: Glutamatergic, l-glutamate dehydrogenase

glutamic acid

 [gloo-tam´ik]
a dibasic amino acid, one of the nonessential amino acids; it is also an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Its hydrochloride salt is used as a gastric acidifier. See also monosodium glutamate.

glu·tam·ic ac·id (E, Glu),

(glū-tam'ik as'id),
An amino acid; the sodium salt is monosodium glutamate. Compare: glutamate.

glutamic acid

/glu·tam·ic ac·id/ (gloo-tam´ik) a dibasic, nonessential amino acid widely distributed in proteins, a neurotransmitter that inhibits neural excitation in the central nervous system; its hydrochloride salt is used as a gastric acidifier. Symbols Glu and E.

glutamic acid

(glo͞o-tăm′ĭk)
n.
A nonessential amino acid, C5H9NO4, occurring widely in plant and animal tissue and proteins, and having monosodium glutamate as a salt.

glutamic acid (Glu)

[glo̅o̅tam′ik]
Etymology: L, gluten, glue, amine, ammonia; acidus, sour
a nonessential amino acid that occurs widely in a number of proteins. Preparations of glutamic acid are used as aids for digestion. See also amino acid, protein.
enlarge picture
Chemical structure of glutamic acid

glu·tam·ic ac·id

(E) (glū-tam'ik as'id)
An amino acid that occurs in proteins; the sodium salt is monosodium glutamate.
Compare: glutamate

glutamic acid

Glutamate, an AMINO ACID present in most proteins. One of its salts, MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, is widely used as a seasoning and flavouring agent and has been suspected as the cause of the CHINESE RESTAURANT SYNDROME.
Glutamic acidclick for a larger image
Fig. 172 Glutamic acid . Molecular structure.

glutamic acid (E, Glu)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins that has an extra carboxyl group and is acidic in solution. See Fig. 172 . The ISOELECTRIC POINT of glutamic acid is 3.2.

glu·tam·ic acid

(glū-tam'ik as'id)
An amino acid; the sodium salt is monosodium glutamate.

glutamic acid,

n a nonessential amino acid occurring widely in a number of proteins. Preparations of glutamic acid are used as aids for digestion.

glutamic acid

a dibasic nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins. It is also an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Its hydrochloride salt is used as a gastric acidifier. The monosodium salt (sodium glutamate; SMG) is used in treating encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease, and to enhance the flavor of foods and tobacco.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dietary sources of L-glutamate include beef, chicken, fish and eggs.
In this study we produced L-glutamate oxidase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture and determined its biochemical characteristic such as optimum working conditions some kinetic parameters.
In order to determine the effect of substrate (L-glutamate ) concentration on L-glutamate oxidase enzyme production from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture the enzyme production was carried out by adding L-glutamate in different concentrations ranging from 1 to 4%.
L-Arg can be catabolized by four sets of enzymes in mammalian cells resulting ultimately in the production of urea, L-proline, L-glutamate, polyamines, NO, creatine, or agmatine (Morris, 2004).
Baker (1987), "Monosodium L-glutamate Induced Asthma," J Allergy Clin Immunol, 80(4):530-7.
Tidball (1972), "Human Susceptibility to Oral Monosodium L-glutamate," Am J Clin Nutr, 25:140-46.
We found that puffing L-glutamate onto the cell bodies of PI 5-8 depolarized these cells in both normal and zero calcium saline, mimicking the physiological response of these neurons to intracellular S-cell stimulation.
in our experimental conditions, we performed the main reaction (lactate to pyruvate) without coupling the auxiliary reaction with L-glutamate and ALT.
In other words, L-glutamate is both an excitatory and an inhibitory transmitter in molluscs (e.
2], a byproduct of the enzymatic conversion of L-glutamate to [alpha]-ketoglutarate catalyzed by glutamate oxidase (5).
Of all the drugs tested, only L-glutamate and acetylcholine (ACh) were observed to cause rapid, localized and reproducible chromatophore expansion (Table 1).
1987) and uptake systems for other amino acids, including L-glutamate, also exist (Trapido-Rosenthal et al.