Korotkoff sounds


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Related to Korotkoff sounds: auscultatory gap

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kŏ-rot'kof),
characteristic noise heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure, as when blood pressure is determined by the auscultatory method.

Korotkoff sounds

[kôrot′kôf]
Etymology: Nickolai Korotkoff, Russian physician, 1874-1920
sounds heard during the taking of a blood pressure reading using a sphygmomanometer and stethoscope. The sphygmomanometer is inflated enough to collapse an artery. As air is released from the cuff, pressure on the artery is reduced, and the blood is heard pulsing through the collapsed vessel. See also blood pressure, diastole, sphygmomanometer, systole.

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kō-rot'kof sowndz)
Aural findings heard during blood pressure determination using a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer. Sounds originating within the blood passing through the vessel or produced by a vibrating motion of the arterial wall.

Korotkoff sounds

The sounds heard through a stethoscope held over a compressed artery with each pulse beat as the compression is gradually released, in the process of measuring the blood pressure with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER. The first pulse sound heard as blood is able to pass through the narrowed artery is Korotkoff phase I. The sounds get louder as the cuff pressure continues to fall, but then there is a sudden muffling. This is Korotkoff phase IV; the cuff pressure at this point has, in the past, been taken as the diastolic pressure. Soon after that the sounds disappear altogether. This is Korotkoff phase V, the cuff pressure at which is now generally taken as the diastolic. (Nikolai Sergeivich Korotkov, 1874–1920, Russian physician).

Korotkoff,

Nikolai S., Russian physician, 1874-1920.
Korotkoff sounds - sounds heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure, as when blood pressure is determined by the auscultatory method.
Korotkoff test - a test of collateral circulation.

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kō-rot'kof sowndz)
Characteristic noise heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure.

Korotkoff sounds (kôrot´kôf),

n.pr the noises heard when taking a blood pressure reading, originated by blood passage causing vibrations in the walls of the blood vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
If Korotkoff sounds persist as the level approaches 0 mm Hg, then the point of muffling of the sound is used (phase IV) to indicate the diastolic pressure.
Subjects for whom we were unable to obtain a blood pressure measurement were eliminated from the study; the most common reasons for inability to obtain measurements were too large of arm for the standard cuff, digital error messages, and inability to hear Korotkoff sounds.
Listening with the bell of the stethoscope may allow the nurse to hear the softer Korotkoff sounds of these children more easily.
Korotkoff sounds were auscultated with a non-disposable professional stethoscope.
Korotkoff sounds I and V were used to define SBP and diastolic BP (DBP) respectively.
The first and fifth Korotkoff sounds indicated systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively.
also allows a clinician or cardiologist to both see and hear Korotkoff sounds using a real-time waveform display and included headphones for added versatility.
Systolic pressure corresponding to the appearance of the Korotkoff sounds and Diastolic pressure corresponding to the disappearance of Korotkoff v sounds.