Koch's postulates


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Koch's postulates

Etymology: Robert Koch; L, postulare, to demand
the prerequisites for experimentally establishing that a specific microorganism causes a particular disease. The following conditions must be met (1) the microorganism must be observed in all cases of the disease; (2) the microorganism must be isolated and grown in pure culture; (3) microorganisms from the pure culture, when inoculated into a susceptible animal, must reproduce the disease; and (4) the microorganism must be observed in and recovered from the experimentally diseased animal.

Koch's postulates

A series of 4 conditions that must be met to establish an infectious agent as the cause of a particular disease or condition. See Molecular Koch's postulates.
Koch's postulates
1. The agent must be present in all cases of the disease
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2. The agent must be isolated from someone with the disease and grown in pure culture
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3. Inoculation into a susceptible organism of the agent–from a pure culture—must produce the disease
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4. The agent must be recovered from the infected–inoculated organism and grown again in culture  
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Koch's postulates

A set of criteria to be obeyed before it is established that a particular organism causes a particular disease. The organism must be present in every case and must be isolated, cultured and identified; it must produce the disease when a pure culture is given to susceptible animals; and it must be recoverable from the diseased animal. (Robert Koch, 1843–1910, German bacteriologist)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, Koch's postulates were tested in Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) with 8 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) (GP780, GP139, GP209, GP528, GP782, GP300, GP777, and GP402) at a previously determined concentration of 10 ng/[micro]l (Torres-Quintero 2013).
So to my mind, neonicotinoid insecticides do not meet Koch's postulates as causal factors for CCD.
Koch's postulates in relation to the work of Jacob Henle and Edwin Klebs.
The key concepts in the Koch's postulates are: (i) specificity of the association of a micro-organism with an infectious condition; (ii) biologically and scientifically plausible correlation of microbiological, pathological and clinical features; (iii) isolation of the causative micro-organism by culturing it on laboratory media; and (iv) reproduction of disease by inoculating the isolated micro-organism into a susceptible host.
Koch's strict criteria of proof of etiology came to be defined as Koch's postulates.
HIV fulfills Koch's postulates as the cause of AIDS.
The inadequacy of the disease metaphor, which some public health specialists seem to take quite literally, is readily apparent when we consider Koch's postulates, the criteria by which suspected pathogens are supposed to be judged: 1) The microorganism must be observed in all cases of the disease; 2) the microorganism must be isolated and grown in a pure culture medium; 3) microorganisms from the pure culture must reproduce the disease when inoculated in a test animal; and 4) the same kind of microorganism must be recovered from the experimentally diseased animal.
The results of studies concerning self replication and Koch's postulates are currently being analyzed.
Koch's postulates state that an organism must be 1) found in all cases of the disease examined, 2) prepared and maintained in a pure culture, 3) capable of producing the original infection, even after several generations in culture, and 4) retrievable from an inoculated animal and cultured again.
However, Koch's postulates cannot be applied to children, so we need to develop other methods of determining the pathologic significance of organisms recovered from infected middle ears.
Researchers haven't yet tested whether IAPV meets the standard requirements, called Koch's postulates, that would define it as the cause of colony-collapse disorder.