Klebsiella


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Related to Klebsiella: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca

Klebsiella

 [kleb″se-al´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature and commonly found in the intestinal tract. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial urinary and pulmonary infections and wound infections. Species include K. pneumo´niae (also called K. friedlän´deri), the etiologic agent of Friedländer's pneumonia; K. pneumo´niae ozae´nae, which occurs in ozena and other respiratory diseases; and K. rhinosclero´matis, a species isolated from patients with rhinoscleroma.

Klebsiella

(kleb'sē-el'ă),
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase. They do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is Klebsiella pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

Klebsiella

/Kleb·si·el·la/ (kleb″se-el´ah) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae); K. pneumo´niae is the etiologic agent of Friedländer's pneumonia and other respiratory infections.

klebsiella

(klĕb′zē-ĕl′ə)
n.
A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in patients with diminished immunity, such as diabetics and alcoholics.

Klebsiella

[kleb′zē·el′ə]
Etymology: Theodore A.E. Klebs, German bacteriologist, 1834-1913
a genus of diplococcal bacteria that appear as small, plump rods with rounded ends. Several respiratory diseases, including bronchitis, sinusitis, and some forms of pneumonia, are caused by infection by species of Klebsiella.

Kleb·si·el·la

(kleb-sē-el'ă)
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase; they do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is K. pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

Klebs,

Theodor Albrecht Edwin, German physician, 1834-1913.
Klebsiella - a genus of bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that occurs in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain.
Klebs disease
Klebs-Loeffler bacillus - a species that causes diphtheria and produces a powerful exotoxin causing degeneration of various tissues, notably myocardium. Synonym(s): Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Klebsiella oxytoca
Klebsiella pneumoniae - Synonym(s): Friedländer bacillus

Klebsiella

a genus of gram-negative bacteria in the tribe Klebsiellae, family Enterobacteriaceae. Includes K. mobilis (syn. Enterobacter aerogenes).

Klebsiella pneumoniae
carried in the vestibule of the vagina, urethra and clitoridal fossa of the mare as normal flora, but invasion of the cervix and uterus does occur, causing metritis and infertility. An occasional cause of bovine mastitis, hematogenous osteomyelitis originating in pulmonary lesions in cattle, bronchopneumonia in dogs, and pyothorax in horses.

Patient discussion about Klebsiella

Q. What is KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE 0.00

A. Klebsiella is a bacteria that can cause different types of infections such as a urinary tract infection or pneumonia, and is considered a not very common pathogen among patients in the community (meaning outside the hospital). It is known as a pathogen that attacks hospitalized patients at a higher frequency and needds good antibiotic treatment.

Q. Are superbugs contagious through the air? Last week we visited my dad in the hospital, and we noticed that on the next room’s door there was a warning sign. After asking, we were told it was a denoting that the patient inside had a superbug (called klebsiella). On our way out we passed against this patient in the hallway – is it possible that I also carry this superbag? Is it dangerous?

A. Usually these bacteria are transmitted from person to person through direct contact, and less through the air. Moreover, these germs are dangerous in ill and debilitated patients, and not in normal healthy individuals.

More discussions about Klebsiella
References in periodicals archive ?
For the outbreak a case was defined as a patient with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella isolated from a clinical specimen (provider requested) or surveillance (routine screening) culture from the shared haematology ICU from 1 to 31 May 2012.
Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections (cIAI) AVYCAZ, in combination with metronidazole, is indicated for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) caused by the following susceptible microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients 18 years or older.
The MHT showed no sFNs for all 3 organisms and a small number of FPs for Klebsiella spp.
Pyogenic liver abscess with a focus on Klebsiella pneunomiae as a primary pathogen: An emerging disease with unique clinical characteristics.
Detection of Klebsiella pneumonaie carbapenemase (KPC) production in non-Klebsiella pneumoniae Enterobacteriaceae isolates by use of the Phoenix, Vitek 2, and disk diffusion methods.
In conclusion, Klebsiella oxytoca may lead to sudden and rapidly disseminating outbreaks in intensive care units.
Klebsiella pneumonia is associated with a 50% mortality rate.
The cooked pasta had a slightly increased yeast count after five seconds and very low levels of Klebsiella were detected at all contact times, three, five and ten seconds," she said.
Arrival of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC carbapenemase in the United Kingdom.