kinesthesia


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Related to kinesthesia: synesthesia

kinesthesia

 [kin″es-the´zhah]
the sense by which position, weight, and movement are perceived. adj., adj kinesthet´ic.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinesthesis
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

/kin·es·the·sia/ (kin″es-the´zhah)
1. the awareness of position, weight, tension and movement.
2. movement sense.kinesthet´ic

kinesthesia

(kĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə, kī′nĭs-)
n.
The sense that detects bodily position, weight, or movement of the muscles, tendons, and joints.

kin′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
kin′es·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

kinesthesia

[kin′esthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, motion, aisthesis, feeling
the perception of one's own body parts, weight, and movement. Also spelled kinaesthesia.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia (kiˈ·ns·thēˑ·sē·),

n the sense through which somatic elements such as body position, muscle tension, and weight are perceived.

kin·es·the·si·a

, kinesthesis (kin'es-thē'zē-ă, -sis)
1. Sense perception of movement; muscular sense.
2. Illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia, kinaesthesis.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

the sense by which position, weight and movement are perceived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Improving kinesthesia produces finer coordination, which trumps brute strength when playing any instrument healthfully, with fluidity, economy of motion and ease.
Our results correlate with the results of these studies, with no differences found between the limbs with respect to joint position sense and kinesthesia (45,46) in active individuals [teenage female gymnasts (46), a mixed group of male and female elite athletes (22,23), and female handball players (47)].
This approach was used to provide equal numerical representation in each of four conditions: kinesthesia, balance and agility exercise training (KBA); resistance exercise training (RT); a combination of KBA and RT (KBA+RT); or control treatment (Control).
touch, kinesthesia, or hearing) or verbal--cognitive processes.
She defines kinesthesia as the ability of one body to sense another body and to re-experience physically sensations projected by that other body.
The author argues that the concept of kinesthesia, or fundamental feeling, is essential when examining Boccherini's works.
The Introduction offers helpful descriptions of the chapters to come, enriched by an important "excursus" on eighteenth-century versions of kinesthesia, which Christian Friedrich Hubner defined as the faculty "by means of which the soul is informed of the state of the body," and which the Abbe Du Bos and the Abbe Condillac developed with typical Enlightenment enthusiasm.
tactile, kinesthesia and proprioceptive cues) and internal sensory information from the body (e.
The vBow was designed to map the kinesthesia of the performer in parallel with mapping the bowing gesture--literally, the posture imparted to the bow--to sound synthesis parameters.
The activity that unifies the diverse sensations--taste, smells, kinesthesia, touch, sound, vision--and which structures the infant's behaviour, is the apperception of the body image (Schilder, 1935).
The new SportsRAC System is the only early-intervention treatment modality to enhance fine motor control, joint kinesthesia and early joint mobility in shoulders, knees and forearms beginning as soon as 48 hours after surgery.
Suggestions can simulate sensory data input such as temperature and pressure sensations, and kinesthesia (Kroger, 1977).