proprioception

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Related to Kinaesthetics: kinesthetic sense

proprioception

 [pro″pre-o-sep´shun]
perception mediated by proprioceptors or proprioceptive tissues.

pro·pri·o·cep·tion

(prō'prē-ō-sep'shŭn),
A sense or perception, usually at a subconscious level, of the movements and position of the body and especially its limbs, independent of vision; this sense is gained primarily from input from sensory nerve terminals in muscles and tendons (muscle spindles) and the fibrous capsule of joints combined with input from the vestibular apparatus.

proprioception

/pro·prio·cep·tion/ (pro″pre-o-sep´shun) perception mediated by proprioceptors or proprioceptive tissues.

proprioception

(prō′prē-ō-sĕp′shən)
n.
The unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself.

proprioception

[prō′prē·əsep′shən]
Etymology: L, proprius, one's own, capere, to take
sensation pertaining to stimuli originating from within the body related to spatial position and muscular activity or to the sensory receptors that they activate. Compare exteroceptive, interoceptive. See also autotopagnosia.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.

proprioception

Neurology The subconscious sensation of body and limb movement and position, obtained from non-visual sensory input from muscle spindles and joint capsules

pro·pri·o·cep·tion

(prō'prē-ō-sep'shŭn)
A sense or perception, usually at a subconscious level, of the movements and position of the body and especially its limbs, independent of vision; this sense is gained primarily from input from sensory nerve terminals in muscles and tendons (muscle spindles) and the fibrous capsule of joints combined with input from the vestibular apparatus.
See also: exteroceptor

proprioception

Awareness of the position in space, and of the relation to the rest of the body, of any body part. Proprioceptive information is essential to the normal functioning of the body's mechanical control system and is normally acquired unconsciously from sense receptors in the muscles, joints, tendons and the balance organ of the inner ear.

proprioception,

n the kinesthetic sense. The sense that deals with sensations of body position, posture, balance, and motion.

proprioception 

Awareness of posture, balance or position due to the reception of stimuli, produced within the organism, which stimulate receptors (called proprioceptors) located within muscles, tendons, joints and the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear. The precise role of proprioception regarding the visual apparatus is uncertain. See Table N1; tonic neck reflex.

proprioception

perception mediated by proprioceptors or proprioceptive tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
To bring this to light as a prejudice, however, requires retrieving constituting subjectivity from anonymity and inquiring into its achievements (11); for example, although kinaesthetic performances play several major constitutive roles, kinaesthetic life itself often remains doubly anonymous--not only "out of awareness," but "proceeding without the explicit control of the active, awake I"--and these performances should accordingly be thematized and described.
Yet above and beyond issues specifically related to kinaesthetic functioning, the overall task of retrieving presuppositions and other performances from anonymity can also be seen in terms of two different directions of research.
Instead, what is at stake is a new type of transcendental experience in which I am lucidly living-through the shifting play of primal sensuous affection and its intimately interwoven affective tone, in its equally intimate correlation with primal kinaesthetic functioning, in the primal standing-streaming present: it is a matter of appreciating primal temporalization not as an abstract or empty form, but in terms of a contentually filled and affectively tinged specificity in which I myself am already kinaesthetically participating (even if I am not consciously controlling my participation).
They may include injurious announcements and theatrical performance whose sign of normative identity is expressed in costuming, for example, or on the kinaesthetic, performative movement of the body.