messenger

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mes·sen·ger

(mes'en-jer),
1. That which carries a message.
2. Having message-carrying properties.

messenger

/mes·sen·ger/ (mes´en-jer) an information carrier.
second messenger  any of several classes of intracellular signals acting at or situated within the plasma membrane and translating electrical or chemical messages from the environment into cellular responses.

messenger

1. Pertaining to ribonucleic acid (RNA) that carries the coded information for protein synthesis from the DNA to the site of protein synthesis, the RIBOSOMES.
2. A HORMONE or other effector capable of acting at a distance from its site of production. A second messenger is a hormone, produced within a cell and operating on internal structures, when another hormone acts on the outer cell membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kill the Messenger es adaptacion del libro del mismo nombre publicado en 2006 por el periodista Nick Schou, reportero y editor del periodico OC Weekly, cuyo trabajo recupera la relevancia de Webb como un hito en la compleja historia del narcotrafico en el hemisferio.
So they would have us kill the messenger - the Stanford 9 test results.
Based on a true story, Kill the Messenger stars Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker, American Hustle) as Gary Webb, the Pulitzer prize-winning journalist who uncovered the CIA's role in using cocaine money to arm Nicaraguan rebels.
It comes down to politics at sort of all levels, and some of it's nasty and some of it is trying to destroy the message or even kill the messenger so to speak," he said.
Pete Wevurski, managing editor, BANG-EB and executive editor for the Oakland Tribune, said the project "is essential to Oakland and essential to us as journalists who wish to emphasize the point that you can kill the messenger, but the message is still going to get through.
A desire to kill the messenger resulted in the peacetime murders of at least 657 men and women who were covering the news in their home countries during the past decade, the INSI reported.