telescope

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Related to Kepler telescope: Hubble Telescope, James Webb Space Telescope

tel·e·scope

(tel'ĕ-skōp),
1. An optic instrument used to visualize or photograph distant or out-of-view objects through magnification of the image or angulation of the reflected light. In medicine, usually combined with endoscopy.
2. Enclosure such that smaller segments collapse into larger.
[tele- + G. skopeō, to view]

telescope 

An optical instrument for magnifying the apparent size of distant objects. It consists, in principle, of two lenses: (1) the objective, being a positive lens which forms a real inverted image of the distant object; (2) the eyepiece through which the observer views a magnified image of that formed by the objective. The eyepiece may be either positive (astronomical or Kepler telescope) or negative (galilean telescope). The magnification M of a telescope is given by the following formula
M = fo/fe
= Do/Dewhere fo is the second focal length of the objective, fe the first focal length of the eyepiece, and Do and De are the diameters of the entrance and exit pupils of the telescope (approximately equal to the diameters of the objective lens and the eyepiece).There are also some telescopes that do not use a lens (or lens system) as objective, as these are difficult to produce if large apertures and minimum aberrations are required. These telescopes use a concave mirror (usually parabolic) as the objective. They are called reflecting telescopes. Light from a distant object is collected by the large concave mirror and reflected onto a small mirror (positive in the Cassegrain telescope and negative in the gregorian telescope). This mirror is located on the optical axis and light is then transmitted through a central hole in the concave mirror onto the eyepiece. In the newtonian telescope the light collected by the large concave mirror is reflected onto a small plane mirror at a 45º angle to the optical axis, and transmitted to the eyepiece, which is at right angles to the optical axis (Fig. T1). See binoculars; eyepiece; telescopic magnification; objective.
astronomical telescope See telescope.
bioptic telescope A system of lenses forming a galilean or Kepler telescope which is mounted high on a plastic spectacle or carrier lens with the distance correction, so as to allow the patient to look through either the telescope, or below, by moving his or her head. It is used to magnify distant objects for patients with low vision. Syn. bioptic position telescope.
Cassegrain telescope See telescope.
Dutch telescope See galilean telescope.
galilean telescope A simple optical system that allows observation of far objects with a low magnification and without image inversion. It consists of a convex lens, which acts as the objective, and a concave lens as the eyepiece. Magnification of such a telescope rarely exceeds ✕ 5. This optical system is used in opera glasses and as a low vision aid (Fig. T1). Syn. Dutch telescope. See binoculars; minification.
gregorian telescope; Kepler telescope; newtonian telescope See telescope.
reflecting telescope A telescope that uses a concave mirror as the objective.
refracting telescope A telescope that uses a positive lens system as the objective.
reverse telescope See visual expander field.
terrestrial telescope A telescope that provides an erect image of a distant object. The image is usually erected by means of a lens system placed between the objective and the eyepiece. It does, however, make the terrestrial telescope relatively longer than an astronomical telescope. See binoculars; erector.
Fig. T1 Telescopes: A, galilean; B, Keplerenlarge picture
Fig. T1 Telescopes: A, galilean; B, Kepler
References in periodicals archive ?
It was also revealed at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washinton on Monday that the Kepler Telescope had found two unclassifiable objects circling a star.
The Kepler telescope is observing planets orbiting other stars, and numerous spacecraft are orbiting our planet to monitor the Earth's resources and environment," Elachi said.
The Kepler telescope launched earlier this year by the American space agency Nasa is designed to detect Earth-like planets orbiting distant stars.
Some 340 new planets have been discovered in the last five years and only last month NASA launched the Kepler telescope, specially designed to search for more planets amongst 100,000 nearby stars.
Ahead of lift-off of the Kepler telescope from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, Nasa's space science chief Ed Weiler said: "This is an historical mission.
The Kepler telescope, named after the German 17th-century astrophysicist, was sent into space on Friday on a rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
2 light-years away, and thanks to the Kepler telescope, astronomers (http://www.
Since 2009 the Kepler telescope has found billions of planets in our galaxy.
Since August 2013, the Kepler telescope has been hobbled by the
5The method: The Kepler telescope peered at 42,000 stars, examining just a tiny slice of our galaxy to see how many planets like Earth are out there.
Around other stars, NASA's Kepler telescope has shown that planets larger than the Earth and within the orbit of Mercury are plentiful," Biller explained.
Today's telescopes are detecting planets around distant stars, and NASA's Kepler Telescope, launched in 2009, is a champion among them," said Nesvorny.