Kennedy disease

(redirected from Kennedy's disease)

Ken·ne·dy dis·ease

(ken'ĕ-dē),
an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy; associated features include distal degeneration of sensory axons, and signs of endocrine dysfunction, including diabetes mellitus, gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy.

Ken·ne·dy dis·ease

(ken'ĕ-dē di-zēz')
An X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy; associated features include distal degeneration of sensory axons, and signs of endocrine dysfunction, including diabetes mellitus, gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy.
Synonym(s): X-linked recessive bulbospinal neuronopathy.

Kennedy,

William, U.S. neurologist.
Kennedy disease - an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
one patient was adult onset SMA (Type 4) and other was Kennedy's disease both patients were male.
In our study Kennedy's disease patient had facial tremors, gynacomestia proximal and distal muscle weakness but patient was able to walk without support.
In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Kennedy's Disease Association, P.
High prevalence of Kennedy's disease in western Finland--is the syndrome underdiagnosed?
Clinical features and molecular biology of Kennedy's disease.
Researchers have shown that in a fourth CAG-repeat illness, Kennedy's disease, the expanded gene pumps out flawed versions of its normal protein, a receptor for the hormone androgen.
In addition, there is a form of the disease known as X-linked spinal-bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, that arises from a defect in a gene called the androgen receptor gene on the X chromosome.
Lloyd endured the effects of Kennedy's Disease for many years; he died at home.