Kabuki

(redirected from Kabuki play)
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Related to Kabuki play: Kabuki Theatre
A regional term for crack pipe made from a plastic rum bottle and a rubber spark plug cover

Kabuki,

highly stylized and sophisticated form of Japanese theater founded in the 17th century.
Kabuki makeup syndrome - Synonym(s): Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
But in Japan, death can be extremely beautiful: the way a person dies in a Kabuki play is usually a scene of beauty.
Today, our main access to this bakumatsu world are the elaborate woodblock prints of Kunisada Utagawa (1786-1864), the convoluted kabuki plays of Namboku Tsuruya (1755-1829), the so-called "reading books" (yomihon) of Bakin Takizawa (1767-1848), and the graphically illustrated "foul tales," or kusazoshi, which were the pulp fiction of their day.
Director Brooke O'Harra and composer Brendan Connelly are careful to assert that they are not trying to faithfully render a Kabuki play or its theatrical language.
Last fall, theatre students at Illinois State University performed Shozo Sato's final academic production, Othello's Passion: A Kabuki Play.
True, Kabuki plays use high-flown archaic language, star septuagenarian men as teenage girls and feature sword duels that are elaborately stylized dances, fought by actors in makeup that has inspired everyone from George Lucas to Kiss.
One of the earliest Kabuki plays was entitled Chaya Asobi, or Playing in the Teahouse (1603).
The following year he wrote a kabuki play, and by 1693 he was writing plays almost exclusively for live theater.
The spectators should know, however, that the show is as finely choreographed as a Kabuki play, and just as relevant to the chronic ills besetting the United States and the world economices.
In particular, Bejart has a deep interest in Japanese culture; which inspired him to create "The Kabuki," based on the kabuki play "Kanadehon Chushingura," as well as "M," which was inspired by the life of Yukio Mishima.
It's a little bit of a kabuki play," said Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists.
Still pretty much undiscovered as collectors' items, the 1,200-year-old, exquisitely drawn ehon banzuke, or "picture-book theatre program," is a dramaturgically sophisticated item, including actors' names, dates of performances and illustrated scenes that tell the story of a kabuki play.
Onoe was praised for his performance in three roles in kabuki play ''Ninagawa Juni Ya (Ninagawa Twelfth Night,)'' which was based on Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.