KOH


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KOH

KOH

chemical formula for potassium hydroxide.

KOH

Abbreviation for potassium hydroxide.

KOH

The chemical formula for potassium hydroxide, which is used to perform the KOH test. The tests is also called a potassium hydroxide preparation.
Mentioned in: KOH Test

potassium hydroxide

; KOH topical, strongly alkaline, caustic and keratolytic chemical, liberating hydroxyl (OH-) ions on dissolution in sweat; OH- ions react with and break down side salt linkages of keratin molecules; formulated as 85% pellets; used to achieve local destruction of tissue (e.g. nail matrix) or lesions (e.g. verrucae); see Table 1
Table 1: Caustic agents used in podiatric practice to achieve local tissue destruction
AgentActionSpecial precautionsContraindications
Monochloroacetic acid (crystals or saturated solution) e.g. single VPKeratolytic; hydrolysing agent
Non-self-limiting
Deep penetration
Painful
Do not use mask if applying solution
Use a mask if applying crystals
Review in 5-7 days
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Salicylic acid paste (40-70%) e.g. single VP; plantar hard cornKeratolytic; hydrolysing agentMacerates tissues
Review in 7-14 days
May be used in conjunction with monochloroacetic acid crystals
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Pyrogallic acid e.g. single VPKeratolytic; oxidizing agentDeep penetration
Review in 3-5 days
Prolonged caustic action
Do not apply more than 3 times sequentially
Stains skin black/brown
Use with great care: may cause deep tissue breakdown
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Trichloroacetic acid (saturated solution; 10% solution) e.g. mosaic VPMild keratolytic
Protein precipitant
Shallow penetration
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Review in 3 weeks
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Silver nitrate (70% solution; 75-95% stick) e.g. mosaic VP; as a protective skin application below a maskProtein precipitant
Self-limiting
Stains skin black/brown
Maximum effect occurs within 24 hours
Some patients show hypersensitivity to silver nitrate (or experience acute pain)
Neutralize with NaCl foot bath
May be applied in alternate layers with trichloroacetic acid
Peripheral vascular disease
Known sensitivity
Potassium hydroxide (KOH; 85% pellets)Strong keratolyticPotentially deep penetration
Action of KOH stopped by application of 5% acetic acid after macerated coagulum has been removed
Single treatment
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Phenol (80% solution or 100% crystal)Protein precipitateAction retarded by flooding with industrial methylated spirit
Skin overspill flooded with glycerine
Review as per postoperative protocol
Peripheral vascular disease (phenol suppresses inflammatory response)

VP, verruca pedis.

KOH

potassium hydroxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the safety of KOH treatment all of our patients in 10% KOH group and over 56% in 5% KOH group experienced mild side effects.
The exact mechanism of action of KOH is not known but the speculated one is as follows.
Benefits of KOH are it is cheap easily available and relatively easily tolerated by pediatric age group depending on the concentration of KOH .
10% KOH solution is more effective than 5% KOH; however the lower concentration may be used in those intolerant to 10% KOH.
It is inferred from the results that intercalates prepared at 750 o C are more hydrolysable compared to the ones preheated at 150 o C and 500 o C with NaOH and KOH, separately.
For evaluating the temperature influence on the thermal stability of the resultant intercalates, one gm portions of pre- baked clay sample were subjected separately to solvent interaction using NaOH and KOH (1 %) as intercalating agents.
KOH is a strong alkali with keratolytic activity and it is routinely used in dermatological practice for diagnostic purposes.
1%) children were completely cleared with KOH treatment (p greater than 0.
5 suggested 10% KOH solution as a safe, effective and inexpensive, noninvasive treatment of MC.
Topical application of KOH, digests keratin and like other physical or chemical therapies, induces inflammation; this in turn stimulates innate and cell-mediated immune response that inhibits MC-induced immunosuppression and eliminates the infection of MC.
Considering its irritant potential, it will be worthwhile to compare 5% KOH vs.