qui tam

(redirected from Jus tam)
Also found in: Legal.

qui tam

(kwī tam) [L., who as well, who also]
A legal claim or type of litigation in which an individual alleges fraudulent billing by a government contractor. Funds recovered by the government as a result of the claim are divided between the government and the relator of the action. The government is entitled to most of the fraudulently obtained money, and the “whistleblower” is given a percentage of the recovered funds as a reward. Qui tam litigation is one way the U.S. government combats Medicare fraud and abuse.
References in classic literature ?
It is the custom of the Mahars to liberate those who remain alive within the arena after the beasts depart or are killed.
He thought the land before him the mainland of Africa, and he knew that should they liberate him here he could doubtless find his way to civilization with comparative ease.
When I broke my way out from the chamber of I-Gos I was indeed upon the verge of believing that you did hate me," he said, "for only hatred, it seemed to me, could account for the fact that you had gone without making an effort to liberate me; but presently both my heart and my judgment told me that Tara of Helium could not have deserted a companion in distress, and though I still am in ignorance of the facts I know that it was beyond your power to aid me.
I ran then to hide until they had passed, thinking to return and liberate you; but in seeking to elude the party I had heard I ran full into the arms of another.
I will see the Princess at once, and oblige her to liberate you.
There can be no doubt that the chemical action, already mentioned, each time liberates fresh gold from some combination.
Can you hesitate to avail yourself of it, when it restores you to your friends, your old pursuits, your health and amusements; when it liberates your faithful and attached servant, whom you otherwise doom to imprisonment for the whole of your life; and above all, when it enables you to take the very magnanimous revenge--which I know, my dear sir, is one after your own heart--of releasing this woman from a scene of misery and debauchery, to which no man should ever be consigned, if I had my will, but the infliction of which on any woman, is even more frightful and barbarous.