Jungian theory

Jungian theory

A body of psychoanalytic theory offered as an alternative to Freud's with its central emphasis on sex. Carl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) defined ‘libido’, more widely, as a general creative life force that could find a variety of outlets. He identified EXTRAVERSION and INTROVERSION and suggested that people could be divided into four categories by their primary interests-the intellect, the emotions, intuition and the sensations. Like Freud, Jung was deeply concerned with symbols which he considered central to the understanding of human nature. He postulated the existence of a layered unconscious psyche, both personal and collective, the latter being common to all humankind. He proposed the concept of ‘archetypes’-inherent tendencies to experience and symbolize universal human situations in distinctively human ways. Never very scientific, Jung later in life moved even further into the airy realms of metaphysical speculation about which no scientific comment is possible. Compare FREUDIAN THEORY.
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Anima is the Jungian theory of the female aspect of the male psyche.
The author offers case studies, Jungian theory, and chapters on robbery, kidnapping, plagarism, electronic theft, children who steal, shoplifting, and so on.
Unfortunately, however, his efforts are largely negated by his frequent reliance on Jungian theory to interpret his medieval texts, his careless use of terms such as "scientific" and "the occult" without explanation of what these are supposed to mean in relation to the Middle Ages, a determination to see alchemy under every bush, carelessness in interpreting some of his material, and a standard of proofreading that is abysmal.
In the Dark of Your Own Psyche: Jungian Theory and Horror" by J.
Any holding strong in Jungian psychology will find this a singularly key pick for understanding the evolution of his theory of psychoanalysis, and will find this accessible reader's edition offers a wider audience access to Jungian theory and its processes.
In all three chapters, the author's disquisition on Jungian theory shifts the focus away from a cinematic analysis of the films' formal aspects and from the political implications of their narratives.
Keywords: Jungian Theory, Myers Briggs Type Indicator, Reliability, Standardization
Surviving Life (15) Using paper cut-outs Czech animator Jan Svankmajer explores Freudian and Jungian theory in a tale about an affair, an office worker, and a woman in red that takes place in his dreams.
Frye's interest in Jungian theory is apparent in his choice of psychoanalytical vocabulary, such as "libido" when referring elsewhere to a "conquering heroic self.
Along these lines, chapter five, "How to Recover the Real: Jungian Analytical Psychology and Film Analysis," serves to introduce Jungian theory, enumerate the advantages of its application to film studies, and acknowledge the limitations of such a method.
Kerslake presents his argument in six interlocking and overlapping chapters which move from discussions of a non-Darwinian theory of instinct, Deleuze's investment in various aspects of Jungian theory (above all the theory of the archetypes and of symbolism), differential accounts of the unconscious, and finally (although this thread is pursued throughout) Deleuze's fascination with themes which fall under the rubric of sorcery.