jugular vein

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Related to Jugular venous: Jugular veins, jugular vein distention

jugular vein

n.
Any of several large veins of the neck that drain blood from the head.

jugular vein (picture)

A nonspecific term that corresponds to veins in the lateral and anterior neck:
(1) Anterior jugular vein; vena jugularis anterior [NA6]. 
(2) External jugular vein; vena jugularis externa [NA6]. 
(3) Internal jugular vein; vena jugularis interna [NA6].

jugular vein

Any of the two pairs of bilateral veins that return blood to the heart from the head and neck. The external jugular vein receives the blood from the exterior of the cranium and the deep parts of the face. It lies superficial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle as it passes down the neck to join the subclavian vein. The internal jugular vein receives blood from the brain and superficial parts of the face and neck. It is directly continuous with the transverse sinus, accompanying the internal carotid artery as it passes down the neck, and joins with the subclavian vein to form the innominate vein. The jugular veins are more prominent during expiration than during inspiration and are also prominent during cardiac decompensation.

When the patient is sitting or in a semirecumbent position, the height of the jugular veins and their pulsations can provide an accurate estimation of central venous pressure and give important information about cardiac compensation.

See also: jugular

jugular vein

The internal or the external jugular vein.
See also: vein
References in periodicals archive ?
There are no studies found on the parameters such as depression, hair loss, constipation, slowness of speech, palpitations, raised jugular venous pressure, cardiovascular manifestation, chest x-ray findings and correlation between the different levels of TSH and cardiovascular manifestation.
history of acute destabilized HF and the presence of orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, nocturnal cough, jugular venous distension, pulmonary rales, third heart sound, and peripheral edema), the diagnostic accuracy of the whole model was increased to 87%.
2]) values, as well as the jugular venous bulb (Sjv[O.
Signs and symptoms may include bruising, normal to mildly enlarged heart on x-ray, low voltage ECG, widened mediastinum on chest x-ray, muffled heart sounds, jugular venous distension, and narrowed pulse pressure.
Physical examination showed a slightly elevated temperature and jugular venous pressure, holosystolic murmur, enlarged liver, abnormal pulse, and pleural effusions.
The presence of jugular venous distension (JVD, LR+ 8.
Studies were conducted by Chudari L S et al [3] to compare the anterior and posterior approaches of internal jugular venous cannulation, Chandralekha M V et al [5] for comparing palpation method and non-palpation method of internal jugular vein cannulation and Lamkinsi T et al [6] for evaluating best approach to cannulate internal jugular vein.
It is known how CSA of the jugular significantly varies determining the so called phenomenon of the jugular venous pulse (JVP) [32, 33].
Comparison of clinical measurement of jugular venous pressure versus measured central venous pressure.
7) It has also been reported to be related to asthma, paroxysmal coughing, protracted vomiting, and jugular venous occlusion.