judgment

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judgment

 [juj´ment]
the ability to make logical, rational decisions and decide whether a given action is right or wrong.
clinical judgment the process by which the nurse decides on data to be collected about a client, makes an interpretation of the data, arrives at a nursing diagnosis, and identifies appropriate nursing actions; this involves problem solving, decision making, and critical thinking.

judgment

[juj′mənt]
Etymology: L, judicare, to judge
1 (in law) the final decision of the court regarding the case before it.
2 the reason given by the court for its decision; an opinion.
3 an award, penalty, or other sentence of law given by the court.
4 the ability to recognize the relationships of ideas and to form correct conclusions from those data as well as from those acquired from experience.

judg·ment

(jŭj'mĕnt)
Ability to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of a behavior or situation and act or react appropriately.
Compare: discrimination
Synonym(s): judgement.

judg·ment

(jŭj'mĕnt)
Ability to evaluate aspects of a behavior or situation and act or react appropriately.
Synonym(s): judgement.

judgment,

n 1. a legal finding.
n 2. the ability to discriminate between or among two or more states or conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
He argued that the INEC counsel who gave his consent to the December 13 judgment of the Federal High Court failed to draw the court's attention to the three subsisting judgments of the Court of Appeal.
Join me at NACM's 120th Annual Credit Congress & Expo in Las Vegas to learn more ways to keep the heat on judgment debtors and secure faster payment on judgments.
A judgment is, of course, of little value if the prevailing party is never able to recover any of the money it is owed.
Article 16 of the Iraqi Civil Code 1951 states that "foreign judgments issued by foreign courts are not subject to enforcement in Iraq unless it was deemed otherwise by a specific Law".
Without compliance a judgment risks actually costing a firm more than it's worth through unforeseen court costs.
5) Traditionally, a judgment was considered void if it contained a jurisdictional defect, while judgments with non-jurisdictional deficiencies were only considered voidable.
Bandura (1997) states that reasonably matched self-efficacy judgments and actions are most desirable, even though higher self-efficacy judgments can enhance motivation to improve future performance.
The Supreme Court decision overturned a British Columbia Court of Appeal judgment that in December, 2003 applied a doctrine of "charitable immunity" to exempt churches from any liability.
The number of county court judgments being made against people is rising at its fastest rate since 1991.
Presently there is a Florida statute that limits judgment liens to 20 years, (3) and there is a Florida statute that limits "actions" on certain judgments to 20 years and other judgments to five years.