Joint Strategic Needs Assessment


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Joint Strategic Needs Assessment

A mechanism by which Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and local authorities in the UK work together to anticipate the future healthcare and well-being needs of their community by ensuring that services meet those needs. JSNAs are designed to inform and drive future investment priorities and thereby plan services more effectively. JSNAs highlight local priorities for improving health, preventing illness and reducing health inequalities by:
• Reducing premature mortality and improve life expectancy;
• Addressing the needs of those with long-term conditions;
• Responding to an ageing society and the needs of older people;
• Improving children and young people's life chances;
• Increasing healthy lifestyles and breaking the cycle of deprivation;
• Assessing needs in health and social care, to instruct commissioning of local services.
References in periodicals archive ?
There will be improved commissioning specifications from using the joint strategic needs assessment (JSNA).
PHE s alcohol, drugs and tobacco division has published a joint strategic needs assessment (JSNA) support pack.
Kirklees Council's annual Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JNSA) paints a gloomy picture of public health over the past year.
More detailed information on the health and wellbeing of Kirklees can be found in our Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) which will be published at the end of July.
The focus for this targeted support will be an agreed set of Leicestershire Together and Local Priorities that link directly into the joint strategic needs assessment 2012.
Help shape the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, which describes the health needs of the local population.
In the annual Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, developed by the Kirklees partnership, health and council officials outlined plans to tackle the health and well-being of Kirklees people.
Researchers looked at the Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNAs), the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies (JHWSs) and Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) strategies of 25 local authorities.
The new Health and Wellbeing Boards, which will have the responsibility of producing Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (between councils and health providers) and Health and Wellbeing Strategies for their local authority areas, should ensure that the needs of prisoners, especially those with mental health problems, are included in their plans.
Mr Timpson has stated that government will be looking at SEN reforms in the light of the NHS mandate and at possible forms of redress in the NHS Constitution, as well as ways there can be links between Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Health and Wellbeing Boards in order to ensure that the NHS and local government are working together to implement the new system.
Hear from strategic leaders, early implementers and stakeholders on key issues, including demonstrating how your Board offers value for money, how to develop Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and collaborative working between key stakeholders to meet the aims and objectives of the health and social care strategy.
Further insight about the pressures we face, the challenges and the key drivers that move us can be found here in the joint strategic needs assessments for both CCGS.
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