Jane Doe


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Related to Jane Doe: Baby Jane Doe
Ethics The name assigned to a terminally ill 13-yr-old girl with an irreversible neurologic disorder hospitalised at the Scottish Rite Children’s Medical Center in Atlanta, whose treatment her doctors deemed futile
Forensics A name which may be assigned to an unidentifed female admitted to hospital without identification or an unidentified female decedent

Jane Doe

Emergency medicine A name assigned to a ♀ admitted to an ER without identifying documents. See John Doe Forensic medicine A name for an unidentified decedent ♀. ;. See End-of-life debate.

John Doe

, Jane Doe
1. In law, a fictitious name used when that of the actual defendant is unknown.
2. Name assigned to an unidentified patient (e.g., one admitted to a hospital in a coma) or to an unidentified corpse brought to the hospital for confirmation of death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ben and Jane Doe Laveille fka 20-20 Motorsports LLC, $843.
During that conversation, Jane Doe 1 expressed fear about having to be near Defendant [2].
Juan & Jane Doe Vicente dba Vicente Farms, $92.
Jane Doe 53 -- the 53rd unidentified female corpse in the county in 1987 -- was released to the morgue for cremation Aug.
As far as the lawsuit is concerned, the claim really should be directed at the Jane Doe defendant, who was working for the Senator and who attempted to confine the conditions under which the Senator would appear.
Sheehy has been involved in a consultative capacity with the Department of Justice on women's issues in criminal law, with the Women's Legal Education and Action Fund on several cases including Jane Doe v.
This real ease, disguised here using the pseudonym Jane Doe, was related to me by Tom Schell of Paradigm Health.
In July 1999, plaintiff Jane Doe got off her cruise ship in Hamilton, Bermuda, a scheduled port-of-call, where she, her friends, and crew members from the Celebrity Cruises ship enjoyed an evening at a club.
As of late August, about 200 such stories had rolled in, including that of the pseudonymous Jane Doe and some submitted "on behalf of people who've passed away.
So fearful was Jane Doe of reprisals that she spoke with a National Public Radio interviewer on the condition of anonymity.