Jamaican vomiting sickness

(redirected from Jamacian vomiting sickness)

ack·ee poi·son·ing

an acute and frequently fatal vomiting disease associated with central nervous system symptoms and marked hypoglycemia, caused by eating unripe ackee fruit of Blighia spaida, a tree common in Jamaica.

Jamaican vomiting sickness

An intoxication by “bush tea” made from unripe fruit of the Jamaican ackee tree (Blighia sapida), which is caused by hypoglycin, a propionic acid derivative that inhibits isovaleryl CoA dehydrogenase, provoking violent vomiting, prostration, drowsiness, convulsions and hypoglycaemia as low as 0.56 mmol/L (US: 10 mg/dl).
 
Mortality
High; death often occurs within 24 hours of ingestion.
 
Pathogenesis
The condition is caused by the metabolites of hypoglycin A, an amino acid that is converted to coenzyme A thioesters and carnitine derivatives; these sequester intracellular carnitine and inhibit fatty acid oxidation, causing accumulation of isovaleric acid with continued fatty acid esterification, resulting in fine-droplet fatty liver.

Jamaican vomiting sickness

An intoxication by 'bush tea,' made from unripe fruit of the Jamaican ackee tree–Blighia sapida and Crotalaria spectabilis, caused by hypoglycin A metabolites Clinical Violent vomiting, prostration, drowsiness, convulsions, hypoglycemia Mortality High, often 24 hrs after ingestion