youth

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youth

(yo͞oth)
n. pl. youths (yo͞oths, yo͞othz)
1.
a. The condition or quality of being young: Travel while you still have your youth.
b. The time of life between childhood and maturity: He was rebellious in his youth.
c. An early period of development or existence: a nation in its youth.
2.
a. A young person, especially a young male in late adolescence.
b. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) Young people considered as a group.
3. Geology The first stage in the erosion cycle.

youth

Adolescence Vox populi
1. A nebulously defined period of development between puberty and maturity.
2. A young person.

youth

(ūth)
The period between childhood and maturity.

Patient discussion about youth

Q. what type of cancer is the most common one for youth?

A. this is an educated guess, but i don't have the paper work to prove it, but i think acute leukemia. i know that it's incidence increased since the 70's. (although decreasing in the 90's..)

More discussions about youth
References in periodicals archive ?
There are references to a German translation identified as "Greflinger Ia'" (48n, 49n), but the bibliography in appendix A, which lists a number of editions of The Isle of Pines, contains no corresponding entry (presumably this is the version that appeared in Georg Greflinger's newspaper Nordischen Mercurius).
A 2006 issue of the journal Utopian Studies dedicated to The Isle of Pines seems to have inspired an outpouring of recent critical examinations of Neville's text.
The intellectual developments of the past half century make the present a propitious time to look again at Henry Neville's The Isle of Pines.
Although all the reprintings of The Isle of Pines in English have not been traced, until the twentieth century most seem to have been based on the core text of June 27, 1668.
He called this island the Isle of Pines, and gave the people, descended from him, the name of the English Pines, distinguishing the tribes of the particular descendants by his wives names, the Englishes, the Sparkses, the Trevors, and the Phills, Philippa being the name of the negro.
Hollis certainly saw something in The Isle of Pines that Ford 150 years later did not see (19).
From the shorter French version, The Isle of Pines was then translated into Italian as Nuovo Scoprimento Dell'Isola Pines Situata oltre la linea Equinotiale.
What makes The Isle of Pines distinct among its utopian contemporaries is the engraver's minimalist approach to the story and the fact that close attention to narrative detail was not a priority.
Neville even reiterated an anecdote from The Golden Coast, or, A description of Guinney, published only three years before The Isle, in which the natives confuse a bagpipe with a living creature (80; see Isle of Pines 31).
He also wrote The Isle of Pines in 1668, a short pamphlet about a man and four women who are shipwrecked on a hitherto unknown island in the Indian Ocean and then discovered by a Dutch ship.
A Profound Pessimism about Empire: The Isle of Pines, English Degeneracy, and Dutch Supremacy.
Editions of The Isle of Pines in Chronological Order and by