African mango

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Related to Irvingia gabonensis: Panax notoginseng

African mango

A fruit from the African rain forest that is allegedly effective in reducing weight (up to 4 kg/month) without changing one’s diet, improving lipid profile (decreased LDL-cholesterol and triglycerids, and increased HDL-cholesterol), reducing blood pressure, reducing post-prandial glucose levels and managing infections. 

The data supporting the claims of efficacy for weight loss were based on a small (40 subjects), statistically weak double-blind study performed in 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
IGOB131, a novel seed extract of the West African plant Irvingia gabonensis, significantly reduces body weight and improves metabolic parameters in overweight humans in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled investigation.
Developing improved methods of processing and utilization of kernels of Irvingia gabonensis (var.
The physical and chemical properties of soils under Irvingia gabonensis are shown in Tables 1 and 2.
Harvesting of Irvingia gabonensis and Irvingia wombulu in Nigerian forests; potentials for the development of sustainable systems.
In October 2008, Life Extension[R] launched a weight loss product which contains the patented Integra-Lean[TM] Irvingia, a proprietary extract of the seed of the West African mango fruit Irvingia gabonensis.
We investigated whether an Irvingia gabonensis seed extract (IGOB131) would provide a more beneficial comprehensive approach influencing multiple mechanisms and specifically PPAR gamma, leptin and adiponectin gene expressions, important in anti-obesity strategies.
Hypoglycaemic effect of the methanol extract of Irvingia gabonensis seeds on streptozotocin diabetic rats.
Irvingia gabonensis is a West African plant extract that has been shown to help support leptin sensitivity in overweight people.
CONCLUSION: Irvingia gabonensis administered 150 mg twice daily before meals to overweight and/or obese human volunteers favorably impacts body weight and a variety of parameters characteristic of the metabolic syndrome.
On May 26, 2009, the US Patent and Trademark Office formally granted a patent on the Irvingia gabonensis extract that Life Extension introduced in November 2008.