irrational

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ir·ra·tion·al

(i-rash'ŭn-ăl),
Not rational; unreasonable (contrary to reason) or unreasoning (not exercising reason).
[L. irrationalis, without reason]

irrational

(ĭ-răsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
a. Not endowed with reason.
b. Affected by loss of usual or normal mental clarity; incoherent, as from shock.
c. Marked by a lack of accord with reason or sound judgment: an irrational dislike.

ir·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
ir·ra′tion·al·ness n.

irrational

[irash′ənəl]
Etymology: L, irrationalis, contrary to reason
pertaining to events, conditions, or behavior that may be considered unreasonable.

irrational

adjective Unreasonable, illogical

ir·ra·tion·al

(ir-rash'ŭn-ăl)
Not rational; unreasonable (contrary to reason) or unreasoning (not exercising reason).
[L. irrationalis, without reason]
References in periodicals archive ?
Being put in a place can be deduced as the ratio of one personality crossing a situation to the circumference of the whole situation, and is itself irrational ([pi]).
Meanwhile, laughter is pleasantly irrational and might also have contributed to the death of Hippasus.
The Hindus recognized that quadratic equations have two roots, and included negative as well as irrational roots.
They could solve quadratic equations, recognizing two solutions, possibly irrational, but usually rejected negative solutions.
According to a recently developed method of assessing the randomness of a sequence of numbers, however, the digits of pi turn out to be more irregular than the digits of the other irrational numbers.
You could have negative integers, negative fractions, and negative irrationals.
Do you agree, my dear Glaucon, that the head of state is irrational like the diagonal of a square?
A popular view is that the great discovery of Pythagoreans was that there are irrational numbers, for example, the positive square root of two.