introspection

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introspection

 [in″tro-spek´shun]
contemplation or observation of one's thoughts and feelings; self-analysis. adj., adj introspec´tive.

in·tro·spec·tion

(in'trō-spek'shŭn),
Looking inward; self-scrutinizing; contemplating one's own mental processes.
[intro- + L. specto, to look at, inspect]

introspection

/in·tro·spec·tion/ (in″trah-spek´shun) contemplation or observation of one's own thoughts and feelings; self-analysis.introspec´tive

introspection

(ĭn′trə-spĕk′shən)
n.
Contemplation of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations; self-examination.

in′tro·spec′tion·al adj.

introspection

[-spek′shən]
Etymology: L, introspicere, to look into
1 the act of examining one's own thoughts and emotions.
2 a tendency to look inward and view the inner self. introspective, adj.

introspection

Psychiatry Self-observation; examination of one's feelings, especially through psychotherapy

in·tro·spec·tion

(in'trō-spek'shŭn)
Looking inward; self-scrutinizing; contemplating one's own mental processes.
[intro- + L. specto, to look at, inspect]

introspection

Examination, usually prolonged, of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth type Hefts calls people-oriented introspectionists, who are able to articulate their active lives in terms of an internal focus.
What he does, rather, is, first, to provide evidence, gleaned mainly from early experiments in introspectionist psychology, which he takes to support his view that there are experiences as of volitions and, second, to respond to Ryle's Concept of Mind attack on the idea that people have experiences as of volitions.
In the late nineteenth century, the German, American and French introspectionists set out to study consciousness experimentally by varying physical stimuli and collecting reports of the corresponding subjective variations.