intima-media thickness

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intima-media thickness

,

IMT

The depth in millimeters of the two inner layers of an arterial wall. IMT is a marker of generalized atherosclerosis. It increases with age, cholesterol intake, smoking, body mass index, and other established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. IMT is measured ultrasonographically, typically in the carotid arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of Common Carotid Artery intima-media thickness among study groups: As per our hypothesis, it was also a potentially anticipated finding that the mean intima media thickness of common carotid arteries was also different and statistically significant among the study groups.
Usefulness of carotid intima media thickness in patient with diabetes mellitus as predictor of coronary artery disease.
Objective: To compare carotid Intima media thickness and atherosclerosis burden amongst healthy, diabetic and hypertensive Pakistani patients.
Vascular reactivity and carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) in women with early and late-onset pre-eclampsia and chronic hypertension.
As regard aortic intima media thickness (aIMT) in our study, it was significantly (p-value <0.
Evaluation of intima media thickness of the common and internal carotid arteries with inflammatory markers in familial Mediterranean fever as possible predictors for atherosclerosis.
Carotid intima media thickness (IMT) is the ultrasound measurement of the two innermost layers of the arterial wall, where atherosclerotic damage begins before plaque occurrence.
Carotid plaque, intima media thickness, cardiovascular risk factors, and prevalent cardiovascular disease in men and women: the British Regional Heart Study.
Using a microscope with 10 X objective micrometry was done and data of intima thickness (IT) media thickness (MT) and intima media thickness (IMT) was noted.
Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) was assessed by the B mode high resolution ultrasound technique (Diasonics VST ultrasound system) as described previously (13, 14).
Cardiovascular phenotyping between the ages of 60 and 64 years with carotid intima media thickness (cIMT; a surrogate marker for cardiovascular events) was used to assess the effect of lifetime exposure to adiposity on cardiovascular risk factors.
In this six-month study, the progression of coronary artery calcification index (CAC) and common carotid intima media thickness (CCA-IMT)--both markers of calcium deposits in arteries detected with computerized tomography--showed a slower progression of the calcification in the vitamin K2/vitamin D group than detected in the vitamin D-alone group of patients.