miscegenation

(redirected from Interracial sex)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

mis·ce·ge·na·tion

(mis'e-jĕ-nā'shŭn),
Marriage or interbreeding of individuals of different races.
[L. misceo, to mix, + genus, descent, race]

miscegenation

Interbreeding between people of different racial backgrounds.

miscegenation

(mĭs″ĕ-jē-nā′shŭn) [L. miscere, to mix, + genus, race]
Sexual relations or marriage between those of different races.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) See Chauncey Loomis's account of Charles Francis Hall's attitude toward interracial sex for this argument (52).
His interpretation of the data may be questioned, but he is utterly forthright in presenting the details of slave life and labor, the pleasures and frustrations of owning slave property, and the personal complications that arose from interracial sex in the extended family life of George Washington and Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.
African American sex radicals, on the other hand, wrote passionately of interracial sex as part of their larger claims for social equality and justice.
Jessica Millward looks at the complexities of interracial sex through the lens of the manumission of female slaves in the antebellum South.
For them, racial classification was a means to the end of garnering public recognition for their experience and destigmatizing interracial sex, families, and hybrid racial identities.
The diagnosis was similar in the three cities; for example in New York, they described a "good white girl" forced into interracial sex, and flamed fears that the women were breeding a mulatto race.
In Part I, in addition to describing the book, I identify and analyze Kennedy's core claims about the legitimate role of the state and social groups in matters of interracial sex, marriage, identity, and adoption.
But the Lott affair brought to the surface all the garbage that was packed into the mind of the Old South, where the fear of interracial sex loomed as the primal terror.
Moreover, except for a question about the number of mulattoes in missionary classes and whether or not they showed "any more capacity than the black" there is little if any discussion of interracial sex, despite the fact that the island housed a large contingent of Union soldiers and most blacks on the island were women and children (109).
Williams is to listen to his wise, wry takes on a number of topics, in much the same narrative voice as in his excellent nonfiction book Flashbacks, where he confronts issues of interracial sex, prejudice, bias in the media, South Africa, Israel, the black middle class, the black family and blacks in Europe.
The taboo against interracial sex - officially expressed in the Immorality Act of 1927 and its amendment in 1950(1) - has roused the fictional imagination of a range of South African writers.
He first delineates "five basic issues involved in the question of miscegenation in the New World" (70) and then further divides the works discussed into those whose primary emphasis is on interracial sex and interracial relationships and those that are more interested in the new races being formed in the New World.