miscegenation

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mis·ce·ge·na·tion

(mis'e-jĕ-nā'shŭn),
Marriage or interbreeding of individuals of different races.
[L. misceo, to mix, + genus, descent, race]

miscegenation

Interbreeding between people of different racial backgrounds.

miscegenation

(mĭs″ĕ-jē-nā′shŭn) [L. miscere, to mix, + genus, race]
Sexual relations or marriage between those of different races.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relatedly, same-sex relationships, like interracial relationships, have been considered a product of mental defect, including by the psychological profession.
Pope (1986) discussed the exchange theory in interracial relationships and concluded that the exchange hypothesis that Black men exchange their higher economic or professional status to White women for their higher caste status was unsubstantiated.
Blacks were twice as likely as whites (83% vs 43%) to report that they were open to involvement in an interracial relationship.
In his first discussion on the subject since last spring, LaSalle said he wasn't making an political statement against interracial relationships because the Benton/Corday union was artistically handled with exceptional, well-written story lines.
One may say the right things and form healthy interracial relationships while remaining complicit ("in what I have failed to do") in the complex webs in which black lives are devalued.
In this memoir, Trevor Noah says his childhood was the product of a criminal act between a white Swiss man and a black South African woman in South Africa; a country where interracial relationships were forbidden.
For those who haven't bothered to do their research, 'white genocide' is an idea invented by white supremacists and used to denounce everything from interracial relationships to multicultural policies (and most recently, against a tweet by State Farm Insurance).
Yet here we are, half a century later, and when it comes to depicting interracial relationships, the caution hasn't gone away.
It describes the historical and sociopolitical context of Japan and issues related to English education and teaching by foreigners; gender issues, interracial relationships between Japanese and Westerners, and issues in English language learning and teaching; the women's motivations for going to Japan, their early days there, how they met their spouses, and their families' reactions to their wanting to marry Japanese men, and the experiences of those who run eikawa (English conversation) schools from their homes or have part-time teaching or full-time academic jobs.
It is an age when interracial relationships are not only misunderstood, but result in family conflict, disgrace, and disinheritance.
To watch Othello and Desdemona's relationship, over and over, come to naught is counterproductive unless it is balanced in the theater by interracial relationships that come to fruition despite hardships.
Writers also broke ground in touching on interracial relationships, rape and domestic violence, despite being a teatime family show.