abdominal angina

(redirected from Intermittent Abdominal Pain)

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis
intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina

abdominal angina

n.
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation.
A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia, resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 mins post-prandially, lasting 1–2 hours, and appearing when 2 or all 3—superior and inferior mesenteric and celiac—major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis; because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients avoid the pain by not eating, and thus lose weight; malabsorption may occur since absorption is O2-dependent
Management Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

abdominal angina

Chronic mesenteric ischemia, see there.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease, with associated significant weight loss.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequate mesenteric circulation.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were 53 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 38 cases with persistent abdominal pain in non-hospitalization group, 70 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 226 cases with persistent abdominal pain in hospitalization group, 20 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 77 cases with persistent abdominal pain in emergency surgery group respectively.
A 42-year-old male with medical history of hypertension and pre-diabetes presented with a 3-month history of fatigue and intermittent abdominal pain without exacerbating or relieving factors.
A 63-year-old female patient was admitted to our gastroenterology department with intermittent abdominal pain in the umbilical region radiating to the back, which was unrelated to nutrition, lasting for one year.
On day 2 of hospitalization, the patient complained of muscle weakness, dizziness, and intermittent abdominal pain.
Long standing intermittent abdominal pain, mostly functional (chronic abdominal pain)
Her symptoms, including intermittent abdominal pain, occasionally intractable, alleviated after fasting and intravenous hydration.
Assessment of patient's history revealed that there have been intermittent abdominal pain, fever, loss of appetite, 10 kg weight loss, weakness, myalgia, and arthralgia of small joints in the last few months.
An 8-year-old boy presented with the following complaints: 8 to 9 episodes per day of greenish black semisolid to watery stool, mild to moderate intermittent abdominal pain, intermittent painful swelling of both his knee and ankle joints and episodes of recurrent vomiting, all of which had been occurring over the course of the month prior to his being seen.
Patients present with nausea, vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain following food and spontaneous reduction is usual in chronic form.
A 46-YEAR-OLD WOMAN sought care in our emergency department (ED) for intermittent abdominal pain that she'd had for 3 weeks.
A 15 year old male patient presented with complaints of chronic intermittent abdominal pain and occasional vomiting.