intuition

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intuition

 [in″too-ĭ´shun]
an awareness or knowing that seems to come unbidden and usually cannot be logically explained.

intuition

(ĭn″too-ĭsh′ĭn, tū-)
1. Assumed knowledge; guesswork; a hunch.
2. Nonrational cognition.

intuition

Knowledge apparently acquired without either observation or reasoning. The idea, although romantically attractive, wilts in the presence of modern psychological and physiological ideas. Few experts now believe that anything can come out of the brain that has not previously gone in, in however fragmentary a form. Intuition is probably the result of the synthesis of information from partly-conscious observations.
References in periodicals archive ?
23) Thus, as human culture via language and our efforts at discursive thinking develops, so does the kind of intellectual intuition we are capable of having evolves with our engagement with the autonomous objects of the third world.
In Alasdair MacIntyre's reflections on contemporary intellectual life, the emphasis is rather on the inability to communicate that is a result of Cartesian reliance on intellectual intuition.
The aesthetic intuition simply is the intellectual intuition become objective.
Schelling, who shared Fichte's critical attitude to the original formulation of Kant's philosophy, (45) took over from Fichte the view that the subject is activity that can be appreciated as such through intellectual intuition, that primordial experience is feeling rather than sensation, that objects of the sensible world can only be understood in relation to the activity of the subject, that conceptual knowledge is derivative from practical engagement in the sensible world, that there can be and is also an appreciation of other subjects as activities rather than objects, and that the formation of the self-conscious self is the outcome of the limiting of its activity by the world and other subjects.
Bishop rejects the 'untenable assertion that there were no philosophical implications to his thought' and situates Jung's work in the history of ideas: 'we should read analytical psychology in terms of a set of problems derived from seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth-century philosophy: the mind--body problem, the question of intellectual intuition, the debate over materialism, and the "struggle for the soul"' (p.
28) Relative to Cassirer's insight, Forster's entire exposition is a systematic effort to establish one version of this development as it runs beyond Kant through Fichte's "subjective" intellectual intuition (in the Wissenschaftslehre), (29) Schelling's "objective" intellectual intuition (in the Naturphilosophie), (30) Goethe's methodological adaptation of Spinozist scientia intuitiva (in the Theory of Color and the Metamorphosis of Plants), (31) and Hegel's "transcendental intuition.
I could at the same time connect a determination of my existence through intellectual intuition, the consciousness of a relation to something outside me would not be required.
It is difficult to interpret Wirth's characterization of intellectual intuition as "an epiphany that alters fundamentally the experience of things .
But what is absent in this grasping is a definite consciousness of that identity (8)--a curious idea that sheds light on the strange capacity of the intellectual intuition to grasp the absolute apart from any act of reflexive consciousness.
Among the merits of Hanewald's book is that it shows that the role played by the intellectual intuition in the Wissenschaftslehre nova methodo marks a significant development from the first Wissenschaftslehre and at the same time a significant distance from Kant's theoretical philosophy.
We have seen that Fichte's concept of intellectual intuition is not to be confused with Kant's notion of the intellectus archetypus--a mode of cognition consistently denied by Fichte as well--but is rather "what is highest in a finite being.
The appendices cover antirealism and the fracture between man and reality, some Thomistic texts on being, Rahner's views on intellectual intuition, "anticipation" and judgment, intellectual intuition, and recollections on the experience of the self as a natural, mystical event.

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