insulin analog

(redirected from Insulin analogue)

insulin analog

A synthetic insulin in which small changes in the amino acid structure of the polypeptide result in changes in the onset, peak effect, or duration of the molecule's physiological effects. Insulin aspart, glargine, and lispro are all insulin analogues.
See also: analogue
References in periodicals archive ?
Semglee is a long-acting insulin analogue that is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents, and children aged two years and over.
2) Human Insulin Analogue Rapid acting Lispro Inj, 100 IU/ml (Recombinant DNA origin) 300 IU Disposable pen with 5 needles per pen
Of these, five were excluded that did not cover some type of insulin analogue.
Insulin analogue is ten times more expensive than human insulin and has no worth-while advantages.
The Food and Drug Administration has declined to approve insulin degludec, calling for more cardiovascular safety data on the long-acting basal insulin analogue, setting back the timeline for its availability by at least a year.
Insulin glargine is a long-acting basal insulin analogue, given once daily to help control the blood sugar level of those with diabetes.
Washington, June 27 (ANI): Diabetes patients' risk of cancer increases if they use the long-acting insulin analogue glargine instead of human insulin, according to a study.
Insuline Detemir is a soluble basal insulin analogue indicated for the basic insulin therapy in both type 1 and 2 diabetes.
Gary, who developed Type 1 diabetes when he was 12, controls his condition with a combination of a long-acting basal insulin analogue to control his background insulin levels and a short-acting insulin that he takes at mealtimes.
The new recombinant DNA insulin analogue glargine (Lantus) may help diabetic children to control their blood sugar levels while avoiding nocturnal hypoglycemia, Dr.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved NovoLog, a rapid-acting insulin analogue produced by Novo Nordisk A/S for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.
According to interviewed Brazilian payers, insulin analogue manufacturers do not currently provide discounts through patient assistance programs, and although some GLP-1 analogue manufacturers offer discounts of up to 50 percent on their drugs through such programs, the substantial outstanding cost means treatment remains inaccessible to most public patients.