instinct

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Related to Instinctive behavior: instinctive behaviour

instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.

in·stinct

(in'stinkt),
1. An enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposeful action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. In psychoanalytic theory, the forces or drives assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]

instinct

/in·stinct/ (in´stinkt) a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species.instinc´tive
death instinct  in psychoanalysis, the latent instinctive impulse toward dissolution and death.
herd instinct  the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct  in psychoanalysis, all of the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species.

instinct

(ĭn′stĭngkt′)
n.
1. An inborn pattern of behavior that is characteristic of a species and is often a response to specific environmental stimuli: the spawning instinct in salmon; altruistic instincts in social animals.
2. A powerful motivation or impulse.

instinct

[in′stingkt]
Etymology: L, instinctus, impulse
an inborn psychological need, such as life instincts of hunger, thirst, and sex, as well as the destructive and aggressive death instincts.

instinct

Psychiatry Inborn drive An unreasoning response to an environmental cue, attributed to the Freudian id Primary human instincts Self-preservation, sexuality; per some, aggression, ego instincts, heroism, social instincts are also primary instincts. See Death instinct, Id.

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
1. An enduring disposition or tendency to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposive action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. psychoanalytic theory The forces assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]

instinct

aspects of behaviour that are not learned, but which appear to be inherited, i.e. INNATE BEHAVIOUR. It is not now used commonly as a scientific term because of the difficulty of distinguishing between some aspects of learning and some aspects of so-called instinctive behaviour.

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
Enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
[L. instinctus, impulse]

instinct

a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species.

herd instinct
the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its patterns of behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach uses instinctive behaviors meshed with higher decision processes as a basis for the selecting actions and strategies.
Synopsis: Herding breed dogs such as Border Collies, Corgis, and Australian Shepherds have incredibly strong instinctive behaviors to do the work they were bred for controlling various kinds of livestock.
Before selling any products with the Animal Welfare Approved seal, farmers must certify their animals have continual access to pasture, as well as the freedom to perform instinctive behaviors, such as interaction with other animals.
We hope this work will reveal specific brain circuits that underlie instinctive behaviors in mammals.
We earn this knowledge through life experiences and as a reaction based on instinctive behaviors.
To counteract that threat, human beings developed instinctive behaviors to find, store and conserve fat in preparation to survive famines.
Whitetail bucks could be compared to humans in that they display various personalities and instinctive behaviors.