innate immune system

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Related to Innate immune response: Adaptive immune response

innate immune system

n.
The component of the immune system in animals that is genetically determined and is nonspecific, as distinguished from the adaptive immune system. Elements of the system include mucous secretions, complement proteins, and certain white blood cells, especially neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
November 29, 2017 -- A stem cell-derived in vitro model displays key small intestine characteristics including innate immune responses, according to a new study.
Targeting mechanisms involved in the innate immune response will potentially lead to the activation of dendritic cells and priming of tumor-targeted T cells and enhance anti-tumor activity.
Inflammation and innate immune response against viral infections in marine fish.
In situ microscopy analysis reveals local innate immune response developed around Brucella infected cells in resistant and susceptible mice.
Now, scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences have developed a new vaccine that involves injecting cells that have been modified so that they can stimulate both an innate immune response and the more specific adaptive response, which allows the body to keep memories and attack new tumor cells as they form.
rubrum grown in the medium using keratin as the only carbon and nitrogen source on the innate immune response of keratinocytes.
The innate immune response usually involves inflammatory reactions and/or production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other signaling molecules.
Moreover, the subset of children who experience excessively frequent respiratory infections likely have disturbances in their microbiome (made worse with antibiotics) and innate immune response.
The injury is often recognized as an inflammatory cause of damaged-tissue debris or molecular factors associated with unusual activation of the innate immune response, independent of host immunologic background (1).
Autophagy, a cellular pathway that promotes homeostasis in response to stress, is a unique response because recent research suggests that it is both part of the innate immune response against some microbes and a pathway that has been subverted to promote the replication of some pathogens.
However, ubiquitin specific peptidase 4 (USP4, proto-oncogene) that is 1 kb away from the C22H3orf62 plays an essential role in the negative regulation of the toll-like receptor/interleukin 1 receptor signaling-mediated innate immune response (Zhou et al.