information overload

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information overload

An excess of information provided to a person in certain situations, resulting in either a wrong decision or the passing of misinformation 1. Patients must have sufficient information at their disposal to give an informed consent for–eg, an elective surgical procedure; this is problematic when a Pt is informed of very rare complications or side effects of a procedure or the anesthesiology. See Uninformed consent. Cf Informed consent.
References in periodicals archive ?
One can hope that the scientific and information management communities, as well as various governmental and standards bodies active in this area, will find opportunities to pool their knowledge in an effort to develop recordkeeping tools they each need to help confront the common infoglut challenge.
Instead of being the authorities who dispense information in lectures prescribed by a discipline-based curriculum - the sage on the stage - they will help students to process the infoglut spewed forth by a global culture which threatens to engulf us- the guide on the side.
You're emphasizing the big data divide here, and in Infoglut (Andrejevic, 2013) you also write about a decline in symbolic efficiency.
Spotter emerged from her firsthand experience with what she called the "business information infoglut problem.
It produces infoglut, which may well be the greatest under-studied problem of our time.
give more prominent in-store promotion; due to consumer infoglut,
Portal software is itself an attempt to solve the infoglut problem, but without a good taxonomic foundation, portals too often end up as very expensive replacements for bookmarks.
Moreover, the ability of users to access digital information at the touch of a button demands new approaches to the problem of infoglut.
Yet the realities of today's business world - infoglut, a highly mobile workforce, functional specialization and opportunistic alliances - work against these success factors," said Lawrence Hawes of Delphi Group.
Current experience suggests that this is not necessarily the case-in a world of infoglut, who needs more?
Although some decry Internet addiction and worry about the stresses produced by infoglut, the World Wide Web does hold some relief when it comes to finding information on life events.